Dome-cile for sale

Home with geodesic dome and $629,000 price tag tops the listings in Southlake

Home with geodesic dome and $629K price tag tops listings in Southlake

Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
In a sea of McMansions throughout Southlake, this geodesic-domed home stands out. Photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
The dome theme is even more prevalent inside, where geometric lines crafted of brown wood contrast with white ceilings and walls. Photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
The stone fireplace brings a rustic feel to the living room. Photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
With strategically placed windows, there's little need for window treatments. Photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
The home has an open concept, desirable for people who like to entertain. Photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
The dome creates interesting lines in the bedrooms. Photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
You can even take in the gorgeous outdoor views from the bathtub. Photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
A deck that opens up to the wooded grounds makes it feel like a treehouse. Photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake
Geodesic dome house, 2056 Kimball, Southlake

Renowned American architect Buckminster Fuller invented the architectural design element known as the geodesic dome in 1954. Sixty-five years after its unveiling, a Fuller-inspired home in Southlake is for sale, and it stands out as one of the most unique local homes the market.

This 3,064-square-foot, geodesic-domed home sits on a secluded, heavily wooded one-acre lot at 2056 N. Kimball Ave., just south of Grapevine Lake and Meadowmere Park.

As explained by Stanford University’s R. Buckminster Fuller Collection, a geodesic dome is a spherical structure constructed of interconnecting lines rather than curved surfaces. When trying to visualize a geodesic dome, think of a soccer ball or a dome-shaped jungle gym.

The Realtors representing the Southlake seller — Pam Taeckens and Rebecca Utley of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage — say the home's geodesic surface offers huge vaulted ceilings, big windows, and skylights. Outside, a dome-shaped roof rises above the house. The dome theme is even more prevalent inside, where geometric lines crafted of brown wood strikingly stand out against white ceilings and walls.

Utley says the abundance of natural lighting ranks among the top features of the three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bathroom home, which is listed at $629,000.

“There are some lovely windows at ground level and strategically placed in the dome to give it a light and airy feeling, gorgeous views, and privacy with very little need for window treatments,” she says.

Utley and Taeckens acknowledge the geodesic dome home will appeal to a “discriminating buyer.”

“I believe each house has its own personality. This home resonates with people who want something unique, and have an appreciation for the art this house is and the vision for what it can be,” Utley says.

Utley notes, however, that the 33-year-old home needs considerable work.

“The right buyer for this home will bring their own vision and stamp to this project,” she says, “and I expect it will look very different in the end. If they choose to keep the current home, I have no doubt they will keep the original dome and character.”

Paul Shia, the home’s owner, settled on the geodesic design after reading about Fuller and after expressing dissatisfaction with the traditional home layouts he’d come across, Utley says. The “open, unique style resonated with him,” so Shia sought out Fort Worth architect Jim Krause to flesh out the geodesic concept, she says.

Shia initially hired a local custom builder to take on the project, but they soon parted ways, so Shia assumed the role of contractor and subcontracted out much of the construction work, Utley says.

In a sea of McMansions that go for upwards of $1 million in Southlake, this more modest home in the woods, with its striking design, certainly stands out.

In fact, Utley says this is the most unique home that she and Taeckens have ever marketed in Dallas-Fort Worth.

“Once we saw it, we knew we wanted to be a part of finding the right buyer and giving it a chance to be rejuvenated,” Utley says.