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Fort Worth Opera presents AIDA

Fort Worth Opera presents AIDA

Photo courtesy of Fort Worth Opera

First presented by Fort Worth Opera in 1958, and last seen in 1999, Giuseppe Verdi’s grandest opera AIDA will be performed as a concert production with the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra. Set in the Old Kingdom of Egypt, Aida tells the fateful story of forbidden love between an enslaved Ethiopian princess, and an Egyptian military commander.

Making his debut with Fort Worth Opera as director is broadway and cabaret star T. Oliver Reid. He has spent the past 20 years working on Broadway shows which have amassed more than 20 Tony Awards. Elaine Rinaldi will also make her Fort Worth Opera debut as the first female conductor in their 75-year history. She is the founder and artistic director of Orchestra Miami, a professional symphonic ensemble based in Miami, Florida.

Photo courtesy of Sid Richardson Museum

Sid Richardson Museum presents "Night & Day: Frederic Remington's Final Decade"

Sid Richardson Museum presents "Stunning Saddle"

Sid Richardson Museum presents "Night & Day: Frederic Remington's Final Decade," which explores works made in the final decade of Remington’s life, when the artist alternated his canvases between the color dominant palettes of blue-green and yellow-orange. The works included range from 1900 to 1909, the year that Remington’s life was cut short by complications due to appendicitis at the young age of 48.

In these final years Remington was working to distance himself from his long-established reputation as an illustrator, to become accepted by the New York art world as a fine artist, as he embraced the painting style of the American Impressionists. In these late works he strove to revise his color palette, compositional structure, and brushwork as he set his Western subjects under an interchanging backdrop of the shadows of night and the dazzling light of day.

Throughout his career Remington revised and reworked compositions across media, from his illustrations to his oils to his three-dimensional bronzes. As part of this process of revision, Remington took extreme measures from 1907 to 1909 when, as part of his campaign toward changing the perception of his art, he destroyed well over 100 works that he felt did not satisfy his new standards of painting.

A contract made with Collier’s magazine that began in 1903 meant that many of the works he destroyed are preserved through halftone reproductions published by that journal. The inclusion of these images in this exhibition offers the opportunity to compare them with modified and remade compositions Remington produced in his final years.

Photo courtesy of Sable Elyse Smith

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Emancipation: The Unfinished Project of Liberation"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Emancipation: The Unfinished Project of Liberation"

In conjunction with the 160th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art will present "Emancipation: The Unfinished Project of Liberation," featuring newly commissioned and recent works by Sadie Barnette, Alfred Conteh, Maya Freelon, Hugh Hayden, Letitia Huckaby, Jeffrey Meris, and Sable Elyse Smith.

The new exhibition visualizes Black freedom, agency, and the legacy of the Civil War in 2023 and beyond. The seven installations, spanning sculpture, photography, and paper and textile fabrications, will react to the legacy of John Quincy Adams Ward’s bronze sculpture The Freedman (1863) from the Carter’s collection and will highlight the diversity of materials and forms in sculpture, installation, and mixed media today. Co-organized by the Carter and the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA), the exhibition demonstrates how historical art collections can be a resource and inspiration for contemporary artistic practices.

Seeking a deeper understanding of what freedom looks like for Black Americans after 160 years, "Emancipation" interrogates the role of sculpture in American life by bringing the perspectives of contemporary Black artists into dialogue with the multi-faceted form and content of Ward’s The Freedman. Initially envisioned and sculpted by Ward before the end of the Civil War, the figure is depicted on the cusp of liberation, with bonds ruptured but not removed. The work is one of the first American depictions of a Black figure cast in bronze, and the Carter’s cast from 1863, dedicated to the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, an all-Black infantry unit, is the only copy of its kind with a key that releases a shackle from the figure’s wrist.

While considered aspirational in its time, over a century and a half later, The Freedman’s reflection of uncertainty and endurance seem to manifest the long reach of American slavery. Contextualized by a selection of other Civil War-era works from the Carter; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park; and other collections, the figure’s contemporary resonance issues a prompt for portraits of freedom, imprisonment, corporality, personhood, and power in 2023 to inform the next century.

The seven living artists represented in "Emancipation" were each invited to explore The Freedman through the lenses of their own lives and the multiplicity of meanings those contexts create for the form of emancipation.

Photo by Christina Fernandez

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Christina Fernandez: "Multiple Exposures"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Christina Fernandez: "Multiple Exposures"

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art will present Christina Fernandez's exhibit, "Multiple Exposures." The exhibition, organized by the California Museum of Photography at UCR ARTS in Riverside, California, is the first extensive survey of work by the Los Angeles-based artist who has spent decades in a rich exploration of migration, labor, gender, her Mexican-American identity, and the unique capacities of the photographic medium itself. The exhibition firmly centers Fernandez’s work within contemporaneous movements including postmodernism and the Chicano movement.

Fernandez is an artist and educator acclaimed for photographs that examine her connections to her native Los Angeles, the intersections between public and private spaces, personal and historical narratives, exurban and urban spaces, and the cultural border and historical relationships between Mexico and the United States.

The artworks showcased in the exhibition span 30 years, illuminating the formal and conceptual threads that connect them. In this comprehensive solo exhibition, Fernandez’s images compel viewers to reconsider history, the border, and the lives that cross and inhabit them.

Photo by David H. Gibson

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Morning Light: Photographs of David H. Gibson"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Morning Light: Photographs of David H. Gibson"

In a world entrenched in societal division and ecological turmoil, it can be refreshing to step back and enjoy the quiet beauty of the natural world. Dallas photographer David H. Gibson has been exploring the beauty of the Southwestern landscape for more than 50 years, building a reputation as an astute interpreter of effervescent moisture and changing light. "Morning Light: The Photographs of David H. Gibson" takes viewers to two of his favorite sites, Cypress Creek in Wimberely, Texas, and Eagle Nest Lake nestled in the mountains east of Taos, New Mexico.

The 20 works in the exhibition draw attention to the artist’s repeated return to each site and his fascination with dawn’s break into day. In those mystical moments, he finds the essence of each spot. Through his photographs, Gibson coaxes us into getting up before dawn, stepping outside, and noticing the quick tempo of early morning’s changing light.

Photo courtesy of Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Charles Truett Williams: "The Art of the Scene"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Charles Truett Williams: "The Art of the Scene"

Charles Truett Williams: "The Art of the Scene" examines the Fort Worth mid-century art scene through the presentation of more than 30 works by Fort Worth artist Charles Truett Williams and the artistic community drawn to his studio salon. Accompanying the works on paper and sculptures are ephemera from the recently acquired archives of Williams, enhancing the Carter’s strong holding of artist archives.

The exhibition is the continuation of the Museum’s research into the artistic legacy of underrepresented artists as part of the Gentling Study Center’s mission.

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These are the 13 can't-miss shows in Dallas-Fort Worth theater for December

Theater Critic Picks

This is, in my opinion, the best time of the year to go see a show. There are so many family-friendly offerings just begging to become traditions, and lots of new interpretations of holiday classics.

Plus, there are always one or two non-holiday themes shows, if you need a break from all the tinsel and holly.

Because there were so many holiday shows that opened late last month, they are included again here for easy planning.

In order of start date, here are 13 local shows to watch this month:

My Fair Lady
Broadway at the Bass, through December 4
Lerner & Loewe’s My Fair Lady tells the story of Eliza Doolittle, a young Cockney flower seller, and Henry Higgins, a linguistics professor who is determined to transform her into his idea of a “proper lady.” But who is really being transformed? The musical boasts such classic songs as “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “The Rain in Spain,” “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly,” and “On the Street Where You Live.”

Jesus Christ Superstar
WaterTower Theatre, through December 11
The iconic rock opera, featuring award-winning music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice, is set against the backdrop of an extraordinary series of events during the final weeks in the life of Jesus Christ as seen through the eyes of Judas. Reflecting the rock roots that defined a generation, the legendary score includes "I Don’t Know How to Love Him," "Gethsemane," and "Superstar."

Twas the Night Before...
Cirque du Soleil, through December 11

Cirque du Soleil’s spin on the beloved Christmas tale is about the wonders of sharing and friendship. The production is a flurry of Christmas cheer and rip-roaring fun with hugely lovable characters that will introduce audiences to the magic of Cirque du Soleil.

Christmas with Nat and Natalie
Casa Mañana, through December 17
Cozy up in the Reid Cabaret Theatre for an “unforgettable” evening with holiday favorites from Nat King and Natalie Cole. The father-daughter duo separately recorded over 100 songs that became hits on the pop charts.

Crystal City 1969
Cara Mia Theatre, through December 18

Inspired by a little-known event in Texas history, Crystal City 1969 is based on the true story of Mexican-American students in South Texas who walked out of their school and into civil rights history. Crystal City became an example of American democracy at its best.

Black Nativity
Bishop Arts Theatre Center, through December 18
Black Nativity, returning to the Bishop Arts Theatre Center stage for its 18th anniversary, is a hand-clapping, toe-tapping, finger-snapping theatrical wonderment, inspired by Langston Hughes' retelling of the Nativity story.

A Christmas Carol: A New Musical Comedy
Casa Mañana, through December 23
Casa Mañana presents a new, fresh twist on a classic Dickens tale that will have children ages 4 to 100 laughing alike. A Christmas Carol: A New Musical Comedy features a contemporary pop score and current pop culture references that are guaranteed to have audiences dancing in the aisles. This show is suitable for all audiences.

A Christmas Carol
Dallas Theater Center, through December 24
Dallas Theater Center presents their annual production of A Christmas Carol, a delightfully reimagined take on Dickens’ enduring classic. Three spirits have come to visit the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge to take him on a fantastic journey through Christmases past, present, and future that annually delights audiences across North Texas. But will it be enough to save Scrooge’s soul?

Head Over Heels
Uptown Players, December 2-18
An inspired mash-up of posh and punk, Head Over Heels is an unpredictable Elizabethan romp about a royal family that must prevent an oracle’s prophecy of doom. In order to save their beloved kingdom, the family embarks on an extravagant journey where they are faced with mistaken identities, love triangles, sexual awakening, and self-discovery, all set to the music of The Go-Go's.

Six
Broadway Dallas, December 6-25

Divorced, beheaded, died, divorced, beheaded, survived. From Tudor queens to pop princesses, the six wives of Henry VIII take the mic to remix 50 years of historical heartbreak into an exuberant celebration of 21st-century girl power.

Handle With Care
Stage West, December 8-January 8
A young Israeli woman on holiday with her grandmother in the United States is confronted by an unexpected turn of events. Now, she finds herself stranded in a motel room on Christmas Eve with an oddball delivery man. Is their meeting an accident, or is it destiny generations in the making? Hilarious and tragic circumstances culminate in a heartfelt romantic comedy about what you can find when you feel lost.

The Dimension of Death
Pegasus Theatre, December 29-January 22

The world premiere of the 22nd Harry Hunsacker adventure by Kurt Kleinmann finds us in the year 1955. Harry, Nigel, and Foster have been dispatched to a Top Secret Air Force base in Nevada where a matter of the highest level of National Security awaits them. They’d heard rumors about Paradise Ranch but the reality of what they saw exceeded their imagination. In no time, however, the bodies start piling up and our trio finds themselves trapped in The Dimension of Death.

I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change
Theatre Three, December 29-February 18
Joe DiPietro and Jimmy Robert’s musical is headline the grand opening of Theatre Too, the intimate downstairs space that has been closed since 2020. Directed by Joel Ferrell and music directed by Vonda K. Bowling, this comedy takes on the truths and myths behind what it means to love, date, or lose someone. The run includes special performances on New Year’s Eve and Valentine’s Day, complete with holiday-focused perks like champagne, chocolates, and flowers.




Ultimate party house with indoor pool hits market for $745,000 in Fort Worth

Wild house for sale

A seemingly inconspicuous home in east Fort Worth shows that you never really know what kind of wild-and-crazy stuff is going on inside a house - and not to judge a building by its exterior.

The four-bedroom, five-bathroom house at 1809 Carl St., four miles east of downtown Fort Worth, recently hit the market for $745,000. At first glance, it looks like many homes in the area. But a peek at the interior photos shows why it's attracted lots of attention on the Zillow Gone Wild Facebook page and Twitter account.

Called a fusion of “ultimate” party house and “coolest” investment property in its Zillow listing, the home seems to be built around an indoor, ground-heated swimming pool complete with slide and diving board.

Additional party house highlights include:

  • An outdoor kitchen
  • An outdoor shower
  • A hot tub
  • Air hockey and pool tables
  • Astro turf from TCU’s field
  • Party lighting
  • Enough parking for a tour bus
  • Multiple indoor and outdoor entertaining areas

The home, built in 1940, features 7,179 square feet of living space on less than half an acre of land. The property includes the main four-bedroom house plus a loft-style studio back house with a hot tub and underground wine cellar.

Thousands of commenters on Zillow Gone Wild shared their thoughts about the unconventional home. Several of them compared the house to game shows, 80s department stores and frat houses.

“It’s like an 80s department store and a game show had a baby. I’m overwhelmed and it was only pictures,” one critic wrote.

“This house screams frat house decorated with the entire contents of a furniture warehouse going out of business sale,” another critic commented.

Some commenters said the house had less than innocent undertones.

“There’s $700,000 worth of coke in that green carpet around the pool, guaranteed,” one commenter said.

Another commenter wrote, “Part Dave and Buster’s, part 1980s drug lord. I LOVE IT.”

Other, nicer comments noted the house’s bright, fun colors and the appeal of an indoor swimming pool.

Lance Blann of Dave Perry Miller Real Estate has the listing; attempts to reach him so far have been unsuccessful.

The heated indoor pool has a slide and a diving board.

To learn more about the Fort Worth home head to its view its listing.

Dallas-Fort Worth artist lands collection of colorful canvases at Target stores

Artist News

A local artist who creates colorful and vibrant art has a collection being sold at Target.

The artist is Roma Osowo of Dallas, and the 18-piece collection features a variety of abstract masterpieces ranging in designs and sizes, each unique but filled with Osowo's joyful and optimistic perspective. The collection is available in Target stores until Sunday, December 4, and online until Monday, September 4, 2023.

The collection came about when a home decor company saw the potential in her talent and made introductions to Target.

There are smaller canvases measuring 10" X 13" and 11" X 11", priced at $14.99, some of which have sold out; and larger canvases measuring 24" X 24", 24" X 30", and 36" X 36", priced from $50 to $85.

Osowo was born and raised in the British Virgin Islands, before migrating to the U.S. when she was 16. She spent more than a decade having a family and put art on the backburner, but returned to painting in earnest in 2017.

She favors rich, vibrant colors, calling herself a "color-loving abstract artist who creates vibrant, joy-filled art to elevate beautiful spaces."

She has also done cellphone cases, calendars, personal diaries, and other home goods, as well as a special clothing collection and resortwear for Trefle, a retailer based in the BVI.

Her work has been collected worldwide, and has been sold in a few retailers in the U.S. such as HomeGoods and Barnes & Noble. She's also has been featured in magazines such as Traditional Home and has worked with brands like Erin Condren, Pressed Juicery, Framebridge, Wexel Art, and Lemonade Pursuits.

“I want people to associate my name with the type of art and feeling they want to create in their homes,” she says. “As well as a name that reminds people that it’s never too late to pursue what you love.”