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Sid Richardson Museum presents "Night & Day: Frederic Remington's Final Decade"

Sid Richardson Museum presents "Stunning Saddle"

Image courtesy of Sid Richardson Museum

Sid Richardson Museum presents "Night & Day: Frederic Remington's Final Decade," which explores works made in the final decade of Remington’s life, when the artist alternated his canvases between the color dominant palettes of blue-green and yellow-orange. The works included range from 1900 to 1909, the year that Remington’s life was cut short by complications due to appendicitis at the young age of 48.

In these final years Remington was working to distance himself from his long-established reputation as an illustrator, to become accepted by the New York art world as a fine artist, as he embraced the painting style of the American Impressionists. In these late works he strove to revise his color palette, compositional structure, and brushwork as he set his Western subjects under an interchanging backdrop of the shadows of night and the dazzling light of day.

Throughout his career Remington revised and reworked compositions across media, from his illustrations to his oils to his three-dimensional bronzes. As part of this process of revision, Remington took extreme measures from 1907 to 1909 when, as part of his campaign toward changing the perception of his art, he destroyed well over 100 works that he felt did not satisfy his new standards of painting.

A contract made with Collier’s magazine that began in 1903 meant that many of the works he destroyed are preserved through halftone reproductions published by that journal. The inclusion of these images in this exhibition offers the opportunity to compare them with modified and remade compositions Remington produced in his final years.

The museum is extending the run of the exhibition to Sunday, April 30, to showcase a rare Remington watercolor titled Cold Day on Picket. The artwork was recently discovered by Museum Director Scott Winterrowd during a visit with Dallas collectors Duffy and Tina Oyster.

Photo by Kendall Stoy Photography

Fort Worth Music Festival & Conference at the Stockyards

The Fort Worth Music Festival & Conference at the Stockyards is a new music networking conference for aspiring agents, managers, promoters, and emerging local Texas-based artists.

Taking place across multiple venues, the inaugural event includes panel discussions and keynote speakers featuring well-established and highly respected live music industry executives, networking opportunities, workshops, and live performances.

Produced by Live Nation, in partnership with Chef Tim Love and Larry Joe Taylor, the Fort Worth Music Festival & Conference at the Stockyards aims to generate awareness surrounding the Texas music scene while working to build an infrastructure where artists can establish and grow their career in Texas and beyond.

Speakers will include Eddie Kolesel, Why & How Management; Artists Josh Abbott and Brendon Anthony of the Texas Music Office; Martha Taylor, Promoter and Attorney for LJT Festival; Artist Radney Foster; Artist and festival promoter Larry Joe Taylor and Quinn Donahue of C3 Presents; Henry Glasscock, booking agent from WME; Ray Johnston, former professional basketball player, cancer survivor, and now artist; and more.

Artists scheduled to perform include Mike Ryan, Kevin Fowler, Radney Foster, Graycie York, Josh Weathers, Gary P. Nunn, Michael Martin Murphey, Deryl Dodd, Prophets & Outlaws, The Tejas Brothers, Davin James, Max Stalling, Dave Perez, Tommy Alverson, Larry Joe Taylor, and more.

Venues will include Tannahill’s Tavern & Music Hall, Tannahill’s Tavern Lounge, White Elephant, Atico Restaurant and Lounge, Love Shack, The Barn at Hotel Drover, and more.

Photo by David H. Gibson

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Morning Light: Photographs of David H. Gibson"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Morning Light: Photographs of David H. Gibson"

In a world entrenched in societal division and ecological turmoil, it can be refreshing to step back and enjoy the quiet beauty of the natural world. Dallas photographer David H. Gibson has been exploring the beauty of the Southwestern landscape for more than 50 years, building a reputation as an astute interpreter of effervescent moisture and changing light. "Morning Light: The Photographs of David H. Gibson" takes viewers to two of his favorite sites, Cypress Creek in Wimberely, Texas, and Eagle Nest Lake nestled in the mountains east of Taos, New Mexico.

The 20 works in the exhibition draw attention to the artist’s repeated return to each site and his fascination with dawn’s break into day. In those mystical moments, he finds the essence of each spot. Through his photographs, Gibson coaxes us into getting up before dawn, stepping outside, and noticing the quick tempo of early morning’s changing light.

Photo courtesy of Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Charles Truett Williams: "The Art of the Scene"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Charles Truett Williams: "The Art of the Scene"

Charles Truett Williams: "The Art of the Scene" examines the Fort Worth mid-century art scene through the presentation of more than 30 works by Fort Worth artist Charles Truett Williams and the artistic community drawn to his studio salon. Accompanying the works on paper and sculptures are ephemera from the recently acquired archives of Williams, enhancing the Carter’s strong holding of artist archives.

The exhibition is the continuation of the Museum’s research into the artistic legacy of underrepresented artists as part of the Gentling Study Center’s mission.

Photo courtesy of Estate of Nam June Paik

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents "I'll Be Your Mirror: Art and the Digital Screen"

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents the landmark "I’ll Be Your Mirror: Art and the Digital Screen," a thematic group exhibition that examines the screen’s vast impact on art from 1969 to the present. This exhibition surveys more than 60 works by 50 artists over the past five decades. The artists included examine screen culture through a broad range of media such as paintings, sculpture, video games, digital art, augmented reality, and video.

Screens affect nearly every aspect of life today. Their pervasiveness has bred a 24/7 breaking news cycle, the looming corporate-sponsored virtual-reality “Metaverse,” unlimited accessibility and content, and an ease in how ideas and images are distributed, undoubtably shaping culture in profound ways.

This exhibition starts in 1969 - the year of the televised Apollo moon landing and the launch of the internet’s prototype, ARPANET - as this was the watershed year where collective connectivity through screens was first mobilized in modern society. This era forged what the media theorist Marshall McLuhan presciently deemed in the 1960s a “global village,” a place where distance is collapsed and people from across the world readily interact.

Following this trajectory, contemporary life is hybrid and increasingly mediated through screens. These flat and finite surfaces embody more than what meets the eye - they hold up a mirror to society and contribute to forming meaning in life and mainstream culture.

Photo courtesy of Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Darryl Lauster: Testament"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Darryl Lauster: Testament"

North Texas-based artist Darryl Lauster’s Testament (2018–20) will inaugurate a series of outdoor creative projects implemented by the Carter. Through the examination of America’s past and present, Lauster’s bronze obelisk calls for the viewer to be a critical reader of information and to look at the function of text in different contexts. Testament combines pop culture references with quotes from primarily U.S. foundational documents bringing to question what we know about our nation’s history and promises.

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'Yellowstone' stars to greet fans at Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo

Yellowstone news

Yellowstone fans, get your comfy shoes ready - there'll be a long line for this one. Cole Hauser a.k.a. "Rip Wheeler" on Yellowstone, and Taylor Sheridan, the show's co-creator, executive producer, and director of the series, will meet fans and sign autographs at the Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo.

The event will take place from 4:30-6:30 pm only on Friday, February 3. Location is the 6666 Ranch booth near the south end of Aisle 700 in the Amon G. Carter, Jr. Exhibits Hall.

According to a February 2 announcement from FWSSR, "fans will have the opportunity to snag an autograph as well as purchase some distinctive Yellowstone and 6666 Ranch merchandise while also enjoying all the features the Stock Show offers."

The event is free to attend (with paid Stock Show admission) and open to the public.

It's the second year in a row for Hauser to appear at FWSSR; in 2022, he and fellow cast mates drew huge crowds.

Sheridan, a Paschal High School graduate, is no stranger to Fort Worth; he lives in a ranch near Weatherford and filmed 1883, the prequel to Yellowstone, in and around Fort Worth. Currently, another spinoff, 1883: The Bass Reeves Story, is filming in North Texas.

The Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo is winding up its 2023 run on Saturday, February 4.

New brunch cafe cracks top spot in this week's 5 most-read Fort Worth stories

This week's hot headlines

Editor's note: A lot happened this week, so here's your chance to get caught up. Read on for the week's most popular headlines. Looking for the best things to do this weekend? Find that list here.

1. New cafe in North Fort Worth does eggtastic breakfast, brunch, and lunch. There's an exciting new restaurant serving breakfast, lunch, and brunch in Fort Worth's Alliance Town Center: Called Eggtastic Brunch Cafe, it's located at 9160 North Fwy. #452, in the same shopping center as Sam Moon, where it opened in mid-April and is already drawing raves from locals for its hearty and well-made dishes, doting service, and cheerful bright atmosphere.

2. Fort Worth chef Tim Love cooks up collection of premium jeans and accessories. Fort Worth chef Tim Love’s next project trades chef’s whites for blue jeans: Love Collection, his debut line of premium women's and men's apparel and accessories, launched Friday, May 19 online and at one of Love’s properties in the Fort Worth Stockyards.

3. Burleson's Jellystone Park unlocks grain bin cabins, covered wagons, and tipis for summer glamping. Ahead of the busy summer travel season, the North Texas Jellystone Park in Burleson has added a few of the coolest new "glamping" accommodations in Texas. Furnished tipis, covered wagons, and grain bin cabins opened to guests on May 19.

4. New lagoon-waterpark with lazy river dives into Dallas-Fort Worth. A long-awaited waterpark in Cedar Hill is debuting Memorial Day weekend with two of Texas' favorite splashy attractions: a lagoon and lazy river. The Lagoon at Virginia Weaver Park will open Saturday, May 27 after more than a year in development.

5. Action-packed Fast X drives home the ridiculousness of series' premise. Believe it or not, we are now over 20 years into the existence of the Fast & the Furious franchise, evolving from a street-racing story to one that could be compared to the Mission: Impossible and James Bond series. Our critic reviews the latest entry, Fast X.

Fort Worth Symphony launches summer concerts with sparkly extra: drones

Fireworks News

The Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra returns in 2023 with its annual summer concert series, Concerts in The Garden, featuring 11 concerts taking place at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, starting May 26 and running through June 11.

This year's lineup includes tributes to the Beatles, the Eagles, and Led Zeppelin, as well as nights featuring cinematic themes such as Harry Potter and Star Wars.

But the coolest part of the 2023 series might be the light show: For the first time, they're replacing old-school fireworks with the use of cutting-edge drones.

Drones are an innovative technology that creates stunning night-sky displays using LED lights. The practice of using drones to create light shows has only been around a few years, but has been used in high-profile Olympics ceremonies as well as by the city of Dallas, who added drones as an enhancement to its 2022 New Year's Eve fireworks display.

They're an up-and-comer with many benefits, both practically and aesthetically, says FWSO VP of operations John Clapp, including avoiding the potential to start fires, as Fort Worth endured on July 4, 2022 when a fireworks show at Panther Island Pavilion started a grass fire and the event had to be shut down.

"The Botanic Garden has a lot of grass, trees, and other landscaping that could pose an issue if fireworks were to go astray," Clapp says. "Parts of Texas are so dry and fires are not uncommon. This seems like a safer option."

"It also reduces the impact on homes and residences in the area - we don’t need that noise late at night and drones don’t have that problem," he says.

"We’re doing all kinds of enhancements to our indoor concerts, and we thought, why not do something with our outdoor concerts, too?" he says.

The company helping the FWSO with its programming is headquartered in North Richland Hills: Called Sky Elements, they're risen to become the top name in drone shows, flying all over the country, from Seattle to Key West to the Santa Monica Pier in California, where they'll be headed for Memorial Day.

The company employs a team of 3D animation specialists who can create displays with customized themes, says VP of development Rick Boss.

"That's one of the fun things about the Symphony's program, it has multiple unique themes like Star Wars, which is quite fun, like putting together pieces of a puzzle," Boss says.

Sky Elements started out as a pyrotechnics company, and they still do fireworks, but they're shifting all of their resources to drones, and can't keep up with demand.

From a practical standpoint, drones surpass fireworks because there's no risk of fire, and they're silent. Noise from fireworks is extremely harmful to people with PTSD as well as to wildlife and pets who get spooked and run in fear; the worst days of the year for animal shelters are July 4 and New Year's Eve.

Drones have also come down in cost to be about the same as fireworks, which have become more expensive in recent years.

The duration of a drone show is 10-15 minutes and is dependent on the drones' battery life. You measure the splendor of a drone show by how many drones. Ross says they've done shows with up to 1,000 drones; their shows for the Concerts in the Garden will deploy approximately 100 drones.

"It's a nice size, and most people haven't seen this before, so it will be a fun one," he says. "I get such a kick out of seeing the joy it brings to people."

Beyond the pragmatic element, drones also offer a more nimble and expansive palette, allowing designers to create designs and displays that fireworks cannot, says the FWSO's Clapp.

"Fireworks kind of spread out and do what they do," he says. "Pattern-wise, it's nice to look at, but the drone shows are artistically fantastic, with images that animate and move into 3D. They let you tell a story."