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Sid Richardson Museum presents "Night & Day: Frederic Remington's Final Decade"

Sid Richardson Museum presents "Stunning Saddle"

Image courtesy of Sid Richardson Museum

Sid Richardson Museum presents "Night & Day: Frederic Remington's Final Decade," which explores works made in the final decade of Remington’s life, when the artist alternated his canvases between the color dominant palettes of blue-green and yellow-orange. The works included range from 1900 to 1909, the year that Remington’s life was cut short by complications due to appendicitis at the young age of 48.

In these final years Remington was working to distance himself from his long-established reputation as an illustrator, to become accepted by the New York art world as a fine artist, as he embraced the painting style of the American Impressionists. In these late works he strove to revise his color palette, compositional structure, and brushwork as he set his Western subjects under an interchanging backdrop of the shadows of night and the dazzling light of day.

Throughout his career Remington revised and reworked compositions across media, from his illustrations to his oils to his three-dimensional bronzes. As part of this process of revision, Remington took extreme measures from 1907 to 1909 when, as part of his campaign toward changing the perception of his art, he destroyed well over 100 works that he felt did not satisfy his new standards of painting.

A contract made with Collier’s magazine that began in 1903 meant that many of the works he destroyed are preserved through halftone reproductions published by that journal. The inclusion of these images in this exhibition offers the opportunity to compare them with modified and remade compositions Remington produced in his final years.

The museum is extending the run of the exhibition to Sunday, April 30, to showcase a rare Remington watercolor titled Cold Day on Picket. The artwork was recently discovered by Museum Director Scott Winterrowd during a visit with Dallas collectors Duffy and Tina Oyster.

Photo courtesy of Sable Elyse Smith

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Emancipation: The Unfinished Project of Liberation"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Emancipation: The Unfinished Project of Liberation"

In conjunction with the 160th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art will present "Emancipation: The Unfinished Project of Liberation," featuring newly commissioned and recent works by Sadie Barnette, Alfred Conteh, Maya Freelon, Hugh Hayden, Letitia Huckaby, Jeffrey Meris, and Sable Elyse Smith.

The new exhibition visualizes Black freedom, agency, and the legacy of the Civil War in 2023 and beyond. The seven installations, spanning sculpture, photography, and paper and textile fabrications, will react to the legacy of John Quincy Adams Ward’s bronze sculpture The Freedman (1863) from the Carter’s collection and will highlight the diversity of materials and forms in sculpture, installation, and mixed media today. Co-organized by the Carter and the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA), the exhibition demonstrates how historical art collections can be a resource and inspiration for contemporary artistic practices.

Seeking a deeper understanding of what freedom looks like for Black Americans after 160 years, "Emancipation" interrogates the role of sculpture in American life by bringing the perspectives of contemporary Black artists into dialogue with the multi-faceted form and content of Ward’s The Freedman. Initially envisioned and sculpted by Ward before the end of the Civil War, the figure is depicted on the cusp of liberation, with bonds ruptured but not removed. The work is one of the first American depictions of a Black figure cast in bronze, and the Carter’s cast from 1863, dedicated to the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, an all-Black infantry unit, is the only copy of its kind with a key that releases a shackle from the figure’s wrist.

While considered aspirational in its time, over a century and a half later, The Freedman’s reflection of uncertainty and endurance seem to manifest the long reach of American slavery. Contextualized by a selection of other Civil War-era works from the Carter; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park; and other collections, the figure’s contemporary resonance issues a prompt for portraits of freedom, imprisonment, corporality, personhood, and power in 2023 to inform the next century.

The seven living artists represented in "Emancipation" were each invited to explore The Freedman through the lenses of their own lives and the multiplicity of meanings those contexts create for the form of emancipation.

Photo by Christina Fernandez

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Christina Fernandez: "Multiple Exposures"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Christina Fernandez: "Multiple Exposures"

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art will present Christina Fernandez's exhibit, "Multiple Exposures." The exhibition, organized by the California Museum of Photography at UCR ARTS in Riverside, California, is the first extensive survey of work by the Los Angeles-based artist who has spent decades in a rich exploration of migration, labor, gender, her Mexican-American identity, and the unique capacities of the photographic medium itself. The exhibition firmly centers Fernandez’s work within contemporaneous movements including postmodernism and the Chicano movement.

Fernandez is an artist and educator acclaimed for photographs that examine her connections to her native Los Angeles, the intersections between public and private spaces, personal and historical narratives, exurban and urban spaces, and the cultural border and historical relationships between Mexico and the United States.

The artworks showcased in the exhibition span 30 years, illuminating the formal and conceptual threads that connect them. In this comprehensive solo exhibition, Fernandez’s images compel viewers to reconsider history, the border, and the lives that cross and inhabit them.

Photo by David H. Gibson

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Morning Light: Photographs of David H. Gibson"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents "Morning Light: Photographs of David H. Gibson"

In a world entrenched in societal division and ecological turmoil, it can be refreshing to step back and enjoy the quiet beauty of the natural world. Dallas photographer David H. Gibson has been exploring the beauty of the Southwestern landscape for more than 50 years, building a reputation as an astute interpreter of effervescent moisture and changing light. "Morning Light: The Photographs of David H. Gibson" takes viewers to two of his favorite sites, Cypress Creek in Wimberely, Texas, and Eagle Nest Lake nestled in the mountains east of Taos, New Mexico.

The 20 works in the exhibition draw attention to the artist’s repeated return to each site and his fascination with dawn’s break into day. In those mystical moments, he finds the essence of each spot. Through his photographs, Gibson coaxes us into getting up before dawn, stepping outside, and noticing the quick tempo of early morning’s changing light.

Photo courtesy of Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Charles Truett Williams: "The Art of the Scene"

Amon Carter Museum of American Art presents Charles Truett Williams: "The Art of the Scene"

Charles Truett Williams: "The Art of the Scene" examines the Fort Worth mid-century art scene through the presentation of more than 30 works by Fort Worth artist Charles Truett Williams and the artistic community drawn to his studio salon. Accompanying the works on paper and sculptures are ephemera from the recently acquired archives of Williams, enhancing the Carter’s strong holding of artist archives.

The exhibition is the continuation of the Museum’s research into the artistic legacy of underrepresented artists as part of the Gentling Study Center’s mission.

Photo courtesy of Estate of Nam June Paik

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents "I'll Be Your Mirror: Art and the Digital Screen"

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents the landmark "I’ll Be Your Mirror: Art and the Digital Screen," a thematic group exhibition that examines the screen’s vast impact on art from 1969 to the present. This exhibition surveys more than 60 works by 50 artists over the past five decades. The artists included examine screen culture through a broad range of media such as paintings, sculpture, video games, digital art, augmented reality, and video.

Screens affect nearly every aspect of life today. Their pervasiveness has bred a 24/7 breaking news cycle, the looming corporate-sponsored virtual-reality “Metaverse,” unlimited accessibility and content, and an ease in how ideas and images are distributed, undoubtably shaping culture in profound ways.

This exhibition starts in 1969 - the year of the televised Apollo moon landing and the launch of the internet’s prototype, ARPANET - as this was the watershed year where collective connectivity through screens was first mobilized in modern society. This era forged what the media theorist Marshall McLuhan presciently deemed in the 1960s a “global village,” a place where distance is collapsed and people from across the world readily interact.

Following this trajectory, contemporary life is hybrid and increasingly mediated through screens. These flat and finite surfaces embody more than what meets the eye - they hold up a mirror to society and contribute to forming meaning in life and mainstream culture.

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Giant sea creatures made of recycled beach trash wash onto Galveston Island in must-see new exhibit

inspiring sea change

A giant great white shark, massive bald eagle, oversized octopus, and more enormous sea life have invaded Galveston Island.

"Washed Ashore," a compelling traveling art exhibit of giant sea animal sculptures made of trash collected from beaches, is now on display across 19 locations in Galveston.

The clever showcase features more than 20 pieces — most more than six feet tall and as much as 17 feet wide — such as coral reefs, jellyfish, penguins, sunfish, and more.

Sculptures can be found at museums, hotels, parks, attractions, and popular outdoor spaces. Thanks to a partnership between Oregon-based non-profit Washed Ashore and the Galveston Park Board, the exhibit, which is open though March 5, is free.

This innovative, powerful exhibit is designed to educate the public about the hazards of plastic pollution in the world’s waterways and comes at a touchstone environmental moment. Some 35 million metric tons of plastic entered the global aquatic ecosystems in 2020, according to the Ocean Conservancy’s research partners.

Similar "Washed Ashore" exhibits have been displayed at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, as well as zoos, aquariums, and botanical gardens across the nation. Notably, this Galveston debut marks the first time the exhibit will not be behind a paid gate, per press materials.

“The sculptures are impressive,” Visit Galveston Chief Tourism Officer Michael Woody says. “But they’re even more impressive when you look at them closely. The artists at Washed Ashore placed recognizable objects – like buckets and shovels – at a child’s eye view. This way, hopefully, they will learn to take with them what they bring to the beach.”

For more information on the exhibit, visit the official site.

Photo courtesy of Visit Galveston

Meet Greta the great white shark.

These are the 5 best food and drink events in Fort Worth this week

This week in gluttony

It’s a frigid start to February this week, but tasty events bring opportunities to warm up once the coldest weather passes. Get cozy with hand-made pasta and wine, a dim sum cooking class, two new Sunday brunch launches, and a complimentary educational class to watch online from the warmth of your own home.

Thursday, February 2

An Evening with Batasiolo Wine Dinner
Only 11 lucky individuals get to partake in this four-course dinner set to take place in il Modo’s intimate pasta-making room. Wines from Beni Di Batasiolo Winery will be paired with each course. Reservations are $199, plus tax and gratuity, and include valet parking. Dinner begins at 6 pm.

Saturday, February 4

Who Eats Cornbread? Who Eats Biscuits? Baking and Texas Identity Webinar by the TCU Center for Texas Studies
Curl up at home with hot biscuits or cornbread while watching this tasty and educational webinar led by Rebecca Sharpless, professor of history at TCU. She’ll talk through the history of baking in Texas and the American South, speaking from research conducted for her latest book, Grain and Fire. Learn who used white cornmeal, who used yellow, who used sugar, who didn’t, flour to fat ratios, and why it all matters. The free webinar begins at 10:30 am.

Jazz Brunch Launch at The Fitzgerald
The Camp Bowie Boulevard restaurant will channel New Orleans vibes with the launch of its new jazz brunch. The live jazz pianist will provide tunes on Fitzgerald’s heated patio both Saturday and Sundays from 11 am-2 pm. Plan for brunch dishes like crab cake Benedict, shrimp and grits, crawfish omelets, and bananas Foster banana pudding.

Dim Sum Time at Indulge Cooking Studio
The downtown cooking studio located inside Third Street Market hosts an array of classes regularly. This one will feature dim sum, the traditional Chinese meal made up of small plates featuring various dumplings and snacks. The menu will include chicken shumai, Chinese greens, spring rolls, and an egg custard tart. The class is $89 and will begin at 11 am.

Sunday, February 5

New Sunday Brunch at Craft & Vine
The Roanoke restaurant, wine bar, and craft cocktail lounge will launch Sunday brunch with new buffet-style stations. Enjoy eggs Benedict, a carving station, waffle bar, and more, as well as champagne flights, a build-your-own Bloody Mary bar, and even a bar cart for crafting Old Fashioneds. The price is $39 per person and $15 for kids 12 and under. Brunch service begins at 10 am and the live music starts at 11 am.

Luke Bryan trucks to Dallas-Fort Worth for 2 tour stops, including Dickies Arena

Country on

Luke Bryan fans, clear your calendars in late September 2023. The five-time Entertainer of the Year and American Idol judge is making not one but two stops in North Texas on his "Country On Tour."

He'll play Dallas' Dos Equis Pavilion on September 28, then scoot over to Fort Worth for a show at Dickies Arena on September 29. The only other Texas stop on his 36-city tour will be in Lubbock, on July 27. (So sorry, Houston, Austin, and San Antonio.)

Special guests throughout the tour will include up-and-coming country artists Chayce Beckham, Tyler Braden, Ashley Cooke, Jackson Dean, Jon Langston, Conner Smith, Alana Springsteen, Hailey Whitters, and DJ Rock.

According to the tour site, Beckham, Dean, Whitters, and DJ Rock will play the Dallas-Fort Worth shows.

Bryan has a history of investing in new artists by inviting them to join him on tour, a press release reminds.

“Artists get into the business to make music and perform it for the fans,” Bryan says in the release. “Leaving it all out on that stage is what it’s all about for me. I’m excited to support and have so many talented new artists along for the ride this year. It’s one of the most rewarding parts of our job.

The tour is named for Bryan's 30th No. 1 single, “Country On” - a celebration of farmers, truckers, military, first responders, and all of Americana that hit the top of the country singles charts around Christmas 2022. He has amassed a career tally of 56 total weeks at #1.

Bryan launches his 2023 headline dates at Resorts World Theatre in Las Vegas on February 1. He's also returning as a judge on ABC's American Idol this spring.

Bryan's "Country On Tour" kicks off June 15 in Syracuse, New York.

Tickets go on sale on at 10 am Friday, February 3 at Lukebryan.com.

Presale for Bryan's fan club members will run 8 am Tuesday, January 31 through 5 pm Thursday, February 2. For details, go HERE.

Citi cardmembers will have access to presale tickets from 10 am Wednesday, February 1 to 10 pm Thursday, Feb 2 through the Citi Entertainment program. For complete presale details visit www.citientertainment.com.