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US Ghost Adventures

A national travel company is showing off the scary side of the Fort Worth Stockyards with the launch of a brand new ghost tour.

US Ghost Adventures, an Orlando-based company that hosts ghost tours in some of the most haunted cities in the country, has just added Fort Worth to its list of tour locations. The one-hour tour is held nightly at 8 pm and includes eight stops within a one-mile walking distance.

Some of the haunted highlights from the tour include Miss Molly’s Hotel (109 W. Exchange Ave.), a former brothel where unexplained activity – think lights turning on and off, heavy breathing, and footsteps heard on the stairs – have long been documented.

The Stockyards Hotel (109 E. Exchange Ave.), built in 1904, is said to be home to the apparition of its developer, Colonel T.M. Thannisch, as well as rodeo cowboy C.D. “Junior” Colwell, who is said to have committed suicide to avoid jailtime for swindling people.

Tour participants will also visit the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame (2515 Rodeo Plaza), where it’s said the six-foot, four-inch ghost of famed actor John Wayne has been seen admiring the cowboy memorabilia on display – even with a museum dedicated solely to him located just steps way at John Wayne: An American Experience.

While other ghost tours exist in Fort Worth, US Ghost Adventures owner Lance Zaal says his tour specializes in storytelling.

“US Ghost Adventures offers EMF detectors and focuses on telling the history behind the hauntings,” says Zaal.

When paranormal activity takes places, theories suggest electromagnetic disturbances can be seen with electromagnetic field (EMF) detectors. Lights on the detector indicate the strength of the disturbances, with a green light meaning little to no activity, yellow meaning moderate activity, and red meaning high activity.

Fort Worth was one of 12 new cities recently added to the US Ghost Adventures roster, as well as Houston and El Paso. The company operates tours in more than 50 cities across the country, and full list of new cities include:

The tour is $25 per person and there’s a two-person minimum. There's also an option to add a 30-minute bonus tour of four additional stops for just $6 per person.

Reservations should be made in advance online, and participants should meet at the Livestock Exchange Building at 131 E. Exchange Ave.

Travel + Leisure heralds Fort Worth among world's 11 best places to visit this January

Here come the tourists

A national magazine is proclaiming what Fort Worth residents already know - that the city is a pretty great place to be this month. A new report by Travel + Leisure has named Fort Worth one of the 11 best places to travel in the United States and around the world in January 2023.

"If the post-holiday blahs typically set in after the busy end-of-the-year season, planning a vacation, even a weekend getaway, can be just what the doctor ordered," writes Patricia Doherty in the article. "Whether you stay close to home for a local staycation or head to a far-off locale, experiencing a new destination or returning to a familiar favorite is a great way to start the year."

The magazine rounded up suggestions for winter sports, sunny beaches, and fun places to explore, they said. The unranked list of 11 places ranges from chilly Park City, Utah and Minneapolis-St. Paul to warm-and-sunny Jamaica and The Bahamas.

Why was Fort Worth included? The Stockyards were a major draw.

Here's what they said:

"The Stockyards area in Fort Worth offers restaurants, bars, clubs, shops, a rodeo, and the history of the state’s famous livestock industry. Family entertainment includes the twice-daily longhorn cattle drive with drovers available for photo ops and questions. Walking tours, a petting zoo, horseback riding, and weekend rodeos at the Cowtown Coliseum are great fun. Shops offer western gear, art, and gifts, and at Flea Style, shoppers can design their own Stetsons. There’s nightlife at Billy Bob’s and the new Tannahill’s Tavern Music Venue, and through February 5, the 'Rodeo Rink' ice skating venue takes over the lawn of the Livestock Exchange Building with live music and a lights display. Stay steps away at Hotel Drover for great food and Texas hospitality."

In a head-scratching omission, the magazine did NOT cite the biggest event of the month in Fort Worth: The Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo, taking place January 13-February 4 at Dickies Arena and across the Will Rogers Memorial complex.

It's a curious thing to leave out - not only because FWSSR is "legendary" - but because specific January festivals and events appear on a few other places in the list (i.e. the Lowcountry Oyster Festival on January 29 in Charleston, South Carolina; and the 10-day Great Northern Festival from January 25-February 5 in Minneapolis-St. Paul).

Nevertheless, Fort Worth was the only Texas city to make the list. The 10 other cities included are:

  • Park City, Utah
  • The Bahamas
  • Las Vegas, Nevada
  • Charleston, South Carolina
  • Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
  • Jamaica
  • Mazatlán, Mexico
  • Queensland, Australia
  • Costa Rica
  • Vienna, Austria
Photo courtesy of NASA

NASA confirms stunning discovery of Space Shuttle Challenger artifact

historic discovery

A TV documentary crew has just made a startling discovery linked to one of the American space program's greatest tragedies, one that deeply resonated in Texas. Divers off the east coast of Florida have found an artifact underwater that NASA confirms is debris from the space shuttle Challenger.

While searching for wreckage of a World War II-era aircraft, documentary divers noticed a large object covered partially by sand on the seafloor, one that was clearly crafted by humans. The team contacted NASA after analyzing the proximity to the Florida Space Coast, the item’s modern construction, and presence of 8-inch square tiles, according to the space agency.

Upon viewing the TV crew's footage, NASA leaders confirmed the object is indeed part of the Challenger, which exploded during launch on January 28, 1986, killing all seven crew members on board — all of whom trained in Houston.

A History Channel documentary depicting the discovery of the Challenger artifact is scheduled to air Tuesday, November 22. While the episode will screen as part of a series about the Bermuda Triangle, the artifact was found well northwest of the area popularly known as the Bermuda Triangle, researchers note.

NASA, meanwhile, is currently considering what additional actions it may take regarding the artifact that will properly honor the legacy of Challenger’s fallen astronauts and their families, the agency notes.

The Challenger disaster is now counted as one of American history's "where were you?" moments. The mission, dubbed STS-51L, was commanded by Francis R. “Dick” Scobee and piloted by Michael J. Smith. The other crew members on board were mission specialists Ronald E. McNair; Ellison S. Onizuka, and Judith A. Resnik; payload specialist Gregory B. Jarvis; and teacher S. Christa McAuliffe.

Space Shuttle Challenger crew 1986 The Challenger crew poses ahead of the mission in January, 1986.Photo courtesy of NASA

McAuliffe, a charismatic civilian with a bright smile, became an international celebrity, bringing everyman accessibility to the space program. She was beloved by fans young and old, and quickly became the face of the doomed mission.

Celebrating NASA's 25th shuttle mission, the spacecraft waited overnight on Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A sudden coastal cold front brought freezing temperatures, causing ice to form on the shuttle. Launch managers cleared the mission for launch at 11:38 am on January 28, despite concerns raised by some shuttle program employees.

A mere 73 seconds after liftoff, major malfunction caused the explosion that killed the seven crew members, a moment captured on live TV and watched by millions.

Later, a NASA investigation revealed that the unexpectedly cold temperatures affected the integrity of O-ring seals in the solid rocket booster segment joints, sparking the explosion.

Challenger's loss, and later Columbia with its seven astronauts – which broke up on reentry in February 2003 over the western United States – greatly influenced NASA’s culture regarding safety. The agency went on to create an Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, developed new risk assessment procedures, and established an environment in which everyone can raise safety concerns.

NASA also created the Apollo Challenger Columbia Lessons Learned Program to share these lessons within the agency and with other government, public, commercial, and international audiences.

“While it has been nearly 37 years since seven daring and brave explorers lost their lives aboard Challenger, this tragedy will forever be seared in the collective memory of our country,” said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson in a statement. “For millions around the globe, myself included, January 28, 1986, still feels like yesterday. This discovery gives us an opportunity to pause once again, to uplift the legacies of the seven pioneers we lost, and to reflect on how this tragedy changed us. At NASA, the core value of safety is – and must forever remain – our top priority, especially as our missions explore more of the cosmos than ever before.”

By law, all space shuttle artifacts are the property of the U.S. government. Members of the public who believe they have encountered any space shuttle artifacts should contact NASA at ksc-public-inquiries@mail.nasa.gov to arrange for return of the items.

Photo courtesy of Fiske family

Prominent home on River Crest Country Club opens for sale of ‘museum-quality’ antiques

Collecting history

UPDATE 10-25-2022: While the estate sale has ended, the home is now officially on the market. Check out the listing here.

---

A century-old house across from the first hole of Fort Worth's River Crest Country Club is opening to the public, and behind the doors is a treasure trove of rare antiques that need new homes.

The stately white two-story at the corner of Crestline Road and Tremont Avenue was the longtime home of Michael and Drinda Fiske and their two sons, Damon and Shannon — a well-known, well-loved family in the neighborhood. Michael, an engineer and entrepreneur, died in 2014; Drinda passed away in November 2021.

Drinda was an avid and experienced collector whose vast assemblage of heirlooms will be shoppable at an estate sale conducted by Urban Potluck Sales, September 1-3.

Her collection fills every nook and cranny of every room in the house, downstairs and up — from vintage tins and cookbooks in the kitchen to antique toys in the children’s bedrooms — and it’s “better than any antique store you will visit,” says Urban Potluck Sales owner Tracy Keltner.

“This house, from start to present, has been nothing short of jaw dropping. The first day I walked in I knew that many of the items were museum quality,” Keltner says. “Most estate sale companies will encounter a house with specific antiques and vintage collections around once or twice a year. Rarely, if ever, do we encounter collections of this magnitude, and of this quality. Everything we touch winds up being something significant.”

Among the fun and significant discoveries:

  • A sterling silver Tiffany & Company small desk calendar, black with tarnish, tucked in with some antique wooden spools. “When I felt it, I knew it was something special — it just took some polishing to be able to read the mark, but was a true treasure,” Keltner says.
  • A Buck Rogers Atomic toy pistol
  • A Clark's Spool Cotton cabinet and table from a general store with a "secret" code to open the cash drawer with a series of hidden brass buttons
  • Spun cotton Victorian Christmas ornaments
  • A Bakelite greyhound-shaped carved pasta cutter
  • "Feather" trees (Christmas trees that are considered to be some of the first artificial Christmas trees)
  • Two tubs full of antique/vintage Halloween items. “Drinda collected papier mache pumpkins and cats. These items have paper faces that are quite rare, most in part because the pumpkins were used as luminarias and probably caught fire,” Keltner says.
  • A small personal diary from a young girl that dated to 1878. “The book was only a tad larger than a business card and had been a Christmas gift as indicated from her entry in the front of the diary," Keltner says. "She had made an entry every day without fail. In the back of the small book was a dog-eared miniature book that she had saved and had noted that the miniature book had been a gift from a Mrs. Harper, who had nicknamed her Adeline. I just found it so intriguing that the diary had survived and that the tiny book had been so special that she had saved it to her adulthood.”
  • A large collection of antique children's shoes. “I found it humbling that most of the antique children's shoes had signs of wear that indicated that the shoes had been worn well past the size of the foot, i.e., the shoes were worn way longer than the foot had grown," Keltner says. "This was a severe reminder that shoes were passed down from kid to kid and that just because your child's foot was in need of a larger size did not mean they got new shoes — the parents had to wait for the money to afford the purchase.”

One of the largest categories are vintage Christmas collectibles — enough to fill several rooms of the second story. Bins and shelves are filled with ornaments, beads, nativity sets from around the world, books, and even post-World War II-era decorations with tags that say, “Made in occupied Japan.”

“Of particular note is her passion for all things from the Victorian era, most specifically Victorian Christmas,” Keltner says. “What makes Victorian Christmas items so charming is that they were not mass produced and were mostly hand made. Over time these pieces, if not cared for properly, will be torn or broken due to their fragile nature. To have a collection this large, and in divine condition, is spectacular. Many of the blown glass ornaments have extensions that are a thin as a toothpick, and under the care of Mrs. Fiske they have been lovingly stored and have survived intact, unbroken.”

Drinda Fiske had a special love of holidays and made the home come alive at Christmas, both for visitors and passersby, remembers her daughter-in-law.

“I have so many wonderful memories of going to their house at the holidays and being in awe of her Christmas tree that was decorated with Steiff teddy bears," says Darlene Fiske, who is married to Michael and Drinda’s son Shannon. "She would arrange them doing certain activities in the tree. Two bears would be having a cup of tea at a table, another swinging in a hammock. There were these vignettes all around the tree; it must have taken her weeks to set it up. The Christmas tree was inside but she put it near the window that faces Crestline so everybody could see it when they drove by.”

And yes, the teddy bears are up for sale.

Home with history
Shopping the sale also gives Fort Worthians a rare opportunity to peek inside the storied home. While the Fiskes were very private people, their daughter-in-law says, the home was the subject of several newspaper and magazine design articles, as well as neighborhood intrigue.

According to a 1975 Fort Worth Star-Telegram feature, the home was built in 1921 by a German couple. (At the time, River Crest Country Club was just 10 years old.) The architecture is Norman, and restoration experts believed it may have been a copy of a house the owners had originally built in Germany.

The Fiskes spent more than a year in the 1970s rebuilding and restoring the house before they moved in and filled it with Drinda’s precious antiques. The newspaper article, headlined "House that found love a traffic stopper," said drivers would regularly slow their cars to glimpse the Fiskes' transformation of the once-dilapidated house.

"After the house was completed, she started collecting antiques," Darlene Fiske says, recalling family trips to Canton, New Orleans, and other antiquing hot spots. “If something caught her eye and it was unusual, she would buy it. She just had this sense for things that had a story to tell.”

The home is not yet on the market but will be seeking new owners to love it as much as the Fiskes did, the family says.

“We’re taking inquiries for the home purchase right now, but are not in a rush and will wait for just the right person,” Darlene Fiske says. “We’re hoping that someone will want to keep the home intact and give it some TLC and a refresh.”

Keltner says working on the estate sale “has been something like opening a time capsule."

"Mrs. Fiske had a keen eye and did not specialize in any particular item to collect,” she says. “What is clear though, is that her love of antiques was all consuming. The magnitude and quality of her collection indicates a lifetime of hunting.”

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The Fiske home is at 4259 Crestline Rd. The public sale will take place 8:30 am-5 pm September 1-3. For more information on the collection and special shopping opportunities, visit the website.

The home, across from the first hole of River Crest Country Club, is more than 100 years old.

Photo courtesy of Fiske family
The home, across from the first hole of River Crest Country Club, is more than 100 years old.
Photo courtesy of Magnolia

7 spectacular surprises inside Chip and Joanna Gaines' new Fixer Upper castle in Waco

Royal revelation

“Are you ready to see your fixer upper?” the enthusiastic tour guide asked, channeling Chip and Joanna Gaines and their famous “big reveal” line from TV’s Fixer Upper. This time, it wasn't the home owners waiting outside a first glimpse at their home makeover; it was a small group of tourists gathered on the porch, ready to step inside the Gaineses’ most ambitious renovation project yet — a century-old castle in Waco.

For the first time ever, Texas’ king and queen of renovation have unlocked the doors and let the public into one of their famed fixer-uppers before it’s featured on their Magnolia Network show.

Known as the historic Cottonland Castle, this three-story, 6,700-square-foot residence was started in 1890 and finished in 1913. The Gaineses purchased the dilapidated structure in 2019 and designed and executed a regal flip that will be featured on an eight-episode special called Fixer Upper: Welcome Home – The Castle, beginning October 14.

They plan to sell it in the fall. But before a home sale comes an open house, and for three months only — through October 29 — the castle is open six days a week for guided tours.

Hour-long castle expeditions take visitors through every room, nook, and cranny — from turret to toilettes. Knowledgeable guides dispense history, impart design information, and reveal behind-the-scenes stories from Chip and Jo that may or may not make it on TV.

For Fixer Upper fans, Magnolia maniacs, and Gaines gangs in Fort Worth, it’s worth the 90-minute drive down I-35 to experience the castle transformation in real life before it hits the small screen. A tour offers the very rare chance to walk through the door (in this case, a 10-foot-tall, 400-pound, solid-oak door) into the world of a Chip-and-Jo reno.

Without revealing too much, here are seven fun surprises you’ll find behind the castle walls.

1. History meets homey. A castle museum, this is not.

“Chip and Joanna’s vision was that they really wanted to honor it with historical pieces but also make it more practical for the modern family that’s going to live here in the future,” guide Megan Shuler said at the beginning of the tour.

While many original features — including seven fireplaces — were restored, the castle has been fixed up as a home for the future, not a shrine to the past. One-of-a-kind and collected antiques (such as the kingly dining room table from Round Top, Texas) blend with pieces from the Gaineses’ own Magnolia Home collection. A 17-page “Castle Sourcebook” lists design elements and products and where to buy them. And in the ultimate modern touch — a branding tie-in — a forthcoming “Colors of the Castle” paint collection will be available through Magnolia this fall.

2. Sweet nods to the castle’s past. Posted on the wall in the foyer is a poem written by Alfred Abeel, the owner who completed construction in 1913. It talks of making the castle “‘home sweet home’ all seasons of the year.”

On the center of the dining room fireplace mantel is Abeel’s family crest, along with the phrase (in Latin), “God’s providence saves me.” Next to it, children’s heights are recorded from the 1930s to the early 2000s, the last time a family lived here.

3. A cozy nook in the turret. The original design was modeled after a small castle on the Rhine River in Germany, and there is one tower turret. A space historically used (in “real” castles) for military defense has, here, been turned into one of the coziest corners of the house. Tucked into a corner next to the winding staircase, two comfy chairs sit under an antique-y light fixture from Austria. It's the perfect place to curl up with a book from the library upstairs.

4. Rooms with storylines. “One of the challenges Chip and Joanna had when they bought the castle was, there was no one, really, they were designing it for,” Shuler explained. “So they would create storylines for each room to help tell their story.”

Two of the four bedrooms, for example, are the “boy’s bedroom,” and “girl’s bedroom.” The storylines are that the future homeowner’s son would come back from college and stay in his childhood bedroom, and that the future homeowner’s granddaughters would stay in the room while hanging out at the grandparents’ house.

The boy’s room contains more masculine furnishings and decor, including a watercolor portrait of Roy Lane, the famous architect who helped complete the castle. The girl’s room is painted in “Rose Pink,” a color named after Joanna’s grandmother.

5. Bodacious bathrooms. There are three-and-a-half “throne rooms” in the castle, and they’re some of the prettiest spaces, mixing metals, woods, and tiles; even original radiators look like works of art. One of the most spectacular rooms in the house, in fact, is a grand, gleaming bathroom — which (tease!) will be fully revealed on the show.

6. Party in the basement. “Gathering spaces” are a hallmark of Chip and Jo’s homes, and in the castle, they take place in the dungeon — er, basement. A “card room” for poker games or family game nights sits next to the family room, which houses the only TV in the castle. The guest bedroom’s also in the basement, along with a laundry room and a former wine cellar now left “blank” for the new owners to reimagine.

7. Behind-the-scenes tales and tidbits. Fixer Upper devotees will devour the charming and quirky tidbits about the Gaineses shared throughout the tour. There are a few design elements and furnishings originally meant for their own home, including an item banished to the castle by their daughters. There’s a fun story about what Chip did when they found bones — yes, bones — in the basement. And, the prime selfie spot for Fixer Upper fans is a large mirror that, the tour guides say, Joanna used to touch up her makeup during the filming of the show.

Castle tour tickets, $50, are available through the website, with 20 percent of proceeds benefiting The Cove nonprofit organization. (Note that the home does not have an elevator and requires guests’ ability to access three staircases.)

Tips for a Magnolia pilgrimage in Waco:
Shop: No castle jaunt would be complete without a stop at the Magnolia Silos complex. A new 8:15 am tour, offered Monday through Saturday, takes visitors behind the scenes and on the roof before the crowds (and the heat) arrive. Hint: August is a “slower” month at the Silos, and Tuesday through Thursday are less crowded. Tour tickets are $25 and come with a free coffee from Magnolia Press.

Eat: Chip and Joanna’s Magnolia Table cafe stays busy all day, every day. If you don’t have time to wait for a table, visit the takeaway market next door. Grab to-go items like pimiento cheese and crackers, a butter flight, banana pudding, and chicken salad sandwiches, and enjoy them on a table outside (if it's not too hot).

Stay: Availability at Magnolia’s four vacation rentals can be hard to come by, but watch the website for nights to pop open. Make it a girls’ getaway with a stay at the grand Hillcrest Estate (which sleeps 12), or go solo and book the darling Hillcrest Cottage, the Gaineses’ newest and smallest lodging, which opened in fall 2021. A forthcoming Magnolia boutique hotel, in the historic Grand Karem Shrine building downtown, is slated to open in 2024.

The castle will be on tour only through the end of October, before it's featured on a special season of Fixer Upper - Wecome Home.

Photo courtesy of Magnolia
The castle will be on tour only through the end of October, before it's featured on a special season of Fixer Upper - Wecome Home.

Billy Bob's Texas renovates showroom to improve concert sound and viewing

Honky-tonk news

The world's largest honky-tonk hasn't necessarily been the world's greatest concert venue, but some renovations coming to Billy Bob's Texas are aiming to improve the concert-going experience.

The Fort Worth venue revealed July 5 that they're embarking on two major upgrade projects to the showroom:

  • Removing the two thick columns in front of the Main Stage that obstruct views.
  • Raising stage-left to the level of the rest of the ceiling, for consistency.

"This, along with our digital ticketing improvements, will revolutionize the way we sell tickets, process our guests to their seats, and book shows," said Billy Bob's Texas general manager Marty Travis at a press conference. "These renovations will be an equally improved experience for the artists, as well as our guests."

He said the improvements are in response to guest feedback.

"We send surveys to all of our online ticket buyers after every show, and our two biggest and most consistent survey complaints are: sound and vision, sound and vision, sound and vision," he said. "So I said, 'We're gonna help beat our biggest problems — they're right in front of us."

He said the renovations will help sound travel better and improve views for 30 to 40 percent of the seats in the building.

The upgrades to the 41-year-old venue come just a few months before the opening of Tannahill's Tavern & Music Hall, the new, nearby Stockyards concert venue from Tim Love and Live Nation, set to open in October.

Billy Bob's will stay open during the estimated three weeks of construction, but concerts will not take place on the Main Stage.

For the next two weekends, all shows will be performed on the Honky Tonk Stage, officials say.

The first two shows back on the Main Stage will be Randy Rogers & Wade Bowen's two-night "Hold My Beer and Watch This" tour stop, July 22-23. The final night of July will feature Fort Worth native (and fan-favorite) Josh Weathers.

In the press conference, Rogers said he'd "heard rumors for years" about the planned venue upgrades and is glad they're finally happening.

"This place, to me, is a dream come true to play," the Cleburne native said. "I get my family, I get my friends, the people I grew up around, and the people who love me the most come to see me play at Billy Bob's more than any other venue in the United States."

The building dates to 1910, when it served as an open-air stock pen to house cattle, a release notes. A roof was added in 1936 as part of the Texas Centennial project, and during World War II, it became a hub to build airplane parts to help with war efforts. In the 1950s and 60s, the building became Clark’s Department Store, "which quickly became famous because all the employees stocking product wore roller skates to make their way around the massive facility," they say.

It opened as Billy Bob's Texas on April 1, 1981.

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Fort Worth's TCU celebrates milestone the best way: with special-edition wine

Vino News

Texas Christian University is celebrating its 150th anniversary with the unprecedented release of two special-edition wines, made by a California winery with a TCU connection.

According to a release, Saarloos + Sons winery in California’s Santa Ynez Valley has created a cabernet sauvignon and a sauvignon blanc to commemorate the university’s sesquicentennial.

The winery is operated by the Saarloos family, a fourth-generation business run by Keith Saarloos — brother of Kirk Saarloos, the head baseball coach at TCU.

"TCU supports my brother, and our family loves this school so much that I immediately said, 'Let's do it,' when we were asked," Keith says.

Normally, Saarloos wine is sold only at the winery, located in Los Olivos, California, or else direct. But they're making an exception for the TCU 150, which will be available in limited quantities at the TCU Campus Store by spring.

“Every one of our wines is an estate wine, which means we grow the grapes, we pick them and we bottle the wine,” Keith says.

Keeping with the family tradition, Keith's daughter Brielle will attend TCU in the fall.

Food writer June Naylor Harris, herself a ’79 TCU graduate, provided tasting notes on the two wines, as follows:

Sauvignon blanc: A medium-bodied wine with smooth balance of mineral and acidic tones, softened with notes of stone fruit, honeydew, and fresh herbs. Pair with soft cheese such as goat, feta, and green peppercorn brie, with grapes and granny smith apples, smoked salmon, salty nuts, Thai-spiced shrimp, and herb-grilled chicken.

Cabernet sauvignon: Rich and bold with moderate acidity, dark fruit tones, earthy notes, and a hint of spice and herbs at the finish, with tannins and structure throughout. Pair with spice-rubbed beef tenderloin, lamb skewers with rosemary-blackberry glaze, venison, elk, charcuterie boards with hard cheese, cured meats, & berries, and dark chocolate truffles.

The labels were created by TCU partners using a gold anniversary crest, reserved for limited use. The back of the bottle includes the primary 150th mark in addition to details about the wine.

The sauvignon is $69, and the cabernet is $119. They'll be available at the Campus Store in late February, in limited quantities.

TCU creative director calls it "a really special year," stating, "not only do we get to create materials that celebrate 150 years of our history, but we're also creating the artifacts that future generations of Horned Frogs will look back on."

New ways to work out — including in a movie theater — abound in Dallas-Fort Worth this February

Fit Feb

Raise your hand if you're still going strong with that resolution to work out more or improve your health. Now raise your hand if you believe every day is a new start, and February is as good a month as any to start a new good-for-you habit.

There are lots of new fitness and wellness studios proving the February theory, with openings galore.

Read on to get caught up on where you should be visiting next, then make note of the fun classes, races, and events happening around Dallas-Fort Worth this month.

EōS Fitness, which recently became headquartered in Dallas, is opening its first Texas location, in Euless at 2401 Rio Grande Blvd.

Memberships start at only $9.99 a month, and include start-of-the-art equipment, group fitness and cycle classes, an indoor pool, hot tub, sauna, a Kids Club, and the unique MOVEoS Cinema, where members can work out while watching a big-screen movie in a theater-like setting.

SweatHouz — which already has locations in Plano, West Village, and Watters Creek — has opened another infrared sauna studio in Preston Royal, at 5959 Royal Ln. It boasts eight private sauna suites and offers cold plunge, hydromassage, and Celluma red light therapies.

Restore Hyper Wellness + Cryotherapy has opened two new locations, in McKinney (1620 N. Hardin Blvd.) and Richardson (212 Campbell Rd.).

Restore provides whole body and localized cryotherapy, IV drip therapy, stretch therapy, Cryoskin facials, mild hyperbaric oxygen therapy, infrared sauna, red and near infrared light therapy, compression therapy, and micronutrient testing.

Dallas Yoga Center has a new home above Gloria's Latin Cuisine at 4140 Lemmon Ave. There are more than 40 classes per week in-person and digitally, with private yoga lessons also available. Single classes, 10-class packs, and monthly memberships that include the wellness immersive experience range from $25 a class to $120 a month.

Fashion brand LoveShackFancy has teamed up with wellness brand BelliWelli to launch a probiotic chocolate chip cookie snack that's free with all purchases at LoveShackFancy stores. The snack bars are gluten-free, dairy-free, and low-sugar, and were designed to help those with IBS improve their gut health.

And now for classes and events. Mark your calendars for:

Stage West First Tuesday, February 7
Yes, this is put on by a theater company, but who better to help you tap into your emotions and leave feeling great? Tune Your Heart with Sound Healing, lead by Sara Southerland, will start at 6 pm and last approximately 90 minutes (the first 20 minutes include a complimentary drink and snacks from the bar).

Sara will then use her voice, crystal singing bowls, chimes, and drum to recharge and relax participants.Tickets are $20 each, with discounts for the theater's season ticket holders.

Hot Chocolate Run, February 11
A chocolate lover's oasis awaits following this 5K, 10K, and 15K, with fondue, dippables, and hot chocolate. Those 21 and up can add one free shot of RumChata, peanut butter whiskey, or Irish cream, if they so choose (be sure to bring your ID!).

Love on the Run, February 18
Be one of the first 350 participants to complete this inaugural USATF-certified race that includes a 10K, and 5K run/walk. All fitness levels are welcome to this family-friendly event, which begins at Toyota Music Factory and benefits the Irving Schools Foundation.

Black Girl Magic Ride, February 20
Head to Grit Fitness in the Design District for these two 60-minute spin classes (6 pm and 6:45 pm), highlighting the studio's Black spin instructors and celebrating Black musical artists.

And be sure to come back on Saturday, February 25, for the Black Business Girl Boss Pop-Up Shop from 8 am-12 pm.

The Cowtown Marathon, February 24-26
See the sights in Fort Worth, from the Stockyards to the Museum District, TCU to Trinity Park, during this half-marathon, full marathon, ultramarathon, healthy HIG relay, kids 5K, adults 5K, and 10K. With so many choices, you're sure to find a race that's right for you.

'80s heartthrob Bryan Adams brings 2023 tour to Fort Worth with rock 'n' roll-icon guest artist

Summer of '23

Canadian singer/songwriter Bryan Adams, who's been entertaining audiences on stage and screen for four decades, is coming to Fort Worth for a show at Dickies Arena - and he's bringing along a very special guest. Adams is teaming up with rock 'n' roll icons Joan Jett and the Blackhearts for his "So Happy It Hurts Tour," stopping in Fort Worth on June 29, 2023.

The U.S. tour kicks off on June 6 in Baltimore, Maryland, and ends August 3 with a show in Seattle. He'll visit just two Texas cities - Fort Worth and Sugar Land, outside Houston, for a show at Smart Financial Centre on June 28.

Adams is touring in support of his 15th studio album, So Happy It Hurts, which was released March 11, 2022 via BMG. The album is nominated for Best Rock Performance at the upcoming 2023 Grammy awards, taking place Sunday, February 5.

Adams also is riding the wave as the lyricist for Pretty Woman – The Musical, the Broadway musical based on the famed Julia Roberts-Richard Gere rom-com. The touring musical currently is on stage at Dallas' Music Hall at Fair Park (through February 5) and is coming to Fort Worth's Bass Hall, February 7-12.

Barrier-breaking rock 'n' roll badass Joan Jett is known for Top 40 hits such as "I Love Rock 'N' Roll," "I Hate Myself For Loving You," and "Crimson and Clover." Joan Jett and the Blackhearts toured last year with Def Leppard, Motley Crue, and Poison. Bad Reputation, a 2018 documentary about Jett's life, is now streaming.

Tickets for the "So Happy It Hurts Tour" go on sale at 12 pm Friday, February 3 via ticketmaster.com.