Photo by Becky Wilkes

Fort Worth Community Arts Center will present an exhibit from Becky Wilkes, titled "Till Death Do Us Part." The exhibit shares the tender and mature relationship between two 89-year-olds reconnected following near-death experiences.

After 67 years of marriage, COVID created an untenable situation for Wilkes’ parents. “Mom” was recovering from a recent stroke and was discharged to live independently. “Dad” suffered from congestive heart failure and was newly placed on hospice within the same facility several impossibly long hallways apart. When lockdowns eliminated their children’s participation in their care and illuminated systemic failures, Wilkes moved them to her home in Azle.

Upon arrival, “Dad” weighed 106 pound at 6’1” and “Mom” struggled to stand from a seated position. It was touch and go for a few weeks, but slowly they both saw recovery as a possibility. Newly reunited, Wilkes discovered her parents devotion to one another. Rarely were they separated more than a few feet. They moved as one unit canvassing the driveway, hallway, and property with their walkers, often spooning one another as they slept.

Seldom are people privileged to witness the final journey of love between their parents in intimate detail. Nothing could have prepared her for the transformation that she was to witness, not only in their health and mental state, but also their relationship with each other and my relationship with them. Almost immediately, she began photographing what they all knew were their final days together. Unexpectedly, their final days stretched to almost a year.

Following the opening reception the exhibit will be on view through July 30.

Fort Worth Community Arts Center will present an exhibit from Becky Wilkes, titled "Till Death Do Us Part." The exhibit shares the tender and mature relationship between two 89-year-olds reconnected following near-death experiences.

After 67 years of marriage, COVID created an untenable situation for Wilkes’ parents. “Mom” was recovering from a recent stroke and was discharged to live independently. “Dad” suffered from congestive heart failure and was newly placed on hospice within the same facility several impossibly long hallways apart. When lockdowns eliminated their children’s participation in their care and illuminated systemic failures, Wilkes moved them to her home in Azle.

Upon arrival, “Dad” weighed 106 pound at 6’1” and “Mom” struggled to stand from a seated position. It was touch and go for a few weeks, but slowly they both saw recovery as a possibility. Newly reunited, Wilkes discovered her parents devotion to one another. Rarely were they separated more than a few feet. They moved as one unit canvassing the driveway, hallway, and property with their walkers, often spooning one another as they slept.

Seldom are people privileged to witness the final journey of love between their parents in intimate detail. Nothing could have prepared her for the transformation that she was to witness, not only in their health and mental state, but also their relationship with each other and my relationship with them. Almost immediately, she began photographing what they all knew were their final days together. Unexpectedly, their final days stretched to almost a year.

Following the opening reception the exhibit will be on view through July 30.

Fort Worth Community Arts Center will present an exhibit from Becky Wilkes, titled "Till Death Do Us Part." The exhibit shares the tender and mature relationship between two 89-year-olds reconnected following near-death experiences.

After 67 years of marriage, COVID created an untenable situation for Wilkes’ parents. “Mom” was recovering from a recent stroke and was discharged to live independently. “Dad” suffered from congestive heart failure and was newly placed on hospice within the same facility several impossibly long hallways apart. When lockdowns eliminated their children’s participation in their care and illuminated systemic failures, Wilkes moved them to her home in Azle.

Upon arrival, “Dad” weighed 106 pound at 6’1” and “Mom” struggled to stand from a seated position. It was touch and go for a few weeks, but slowly they both saw recovery as a possibility. Newly reunited, Wilkes discovered her parents devotion to one another. Rarely were they separated more than a few feet. They moved as one unit canvassing the driveway, hallway, and property with their walkers, often spooning one another as they slept.

Seldom are people privileged to witness the final journey of love between their parents in intimate detail. Nothing could have prepared her for the transformation that she was to witness, not only in their health and mental state, but also their relationship with each other and my relationship with them. Almost immediately, she began photographing what they all knew were their final days together. Unexpectedly, their final days stretched to almost a year.

Following the opening reception the exhibit will be on view through July 30.

WHEN

WHERE

Fort Worth Community Arts Center
1300 Gendy St.
Fort Worth, TX 76107
https://www.artsfortworth.org/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.