Quantcast
Photo courtesy of Raphaël Barontini

The Art Galleries at TCU will present "Caribbean Fantasia," featuring new work by artist Raphaël Barontini. The Paris-based artist uses photographic imagery on textiles to create installations that conjure spectacle, celebration and ritual. From large-scale colorful banners and flags to items of customized clothing, his vibrant printed fabric work combines pattern and portraiture that is both eye-catching and alluring. His juxtaposition of seductive surfaces, playful fringe and tassels against silky drapery and soft leather, creates a dynamic gallery environment that suggests performance and improvisation.

For TCU, Barontini presents an immersive panorama at Fort Worth Contemporary Arts where visitors will be surrounded by large-scale fabric works, accompanied by an audio piece commissioned by hip hop musician Mike Ladd. Inspired by Barontini’s research on Haitian General Toussaint Louverture (1743-1803) and other leaders of the Haitian Revolution (1791–1804), the exhibition engages with a precise historical moment, the Battle of Vertières, and the fight independence from French colonial rule. Barontini considers equestrian portraiture as a symbol of identity and power, and in the context of Fort Worth, reflects on the history of the American cowboy, or more specifically, cowboys of color. Understood in this way Caribbean Fantasia represents an imaginary vision of a cavalcade for freedom.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on view through May 2.

The Art Galleries at TCU will present "Caribbean Fantasia," featuring new work by artist Raphaël Barontini. The Paris-based artist uses photographic imagery on textiles to create installations that conjure spectacle, celebration and ritual. From large-scale colorful banners and flags to items of customized clothing, his vibrant printed fabric work combines pattern and portraiture that is both eye-catching and alluring. His juxtaposition of seductive surfaces, playful fringe and tassels against silky drapery and soft leather, creates a dynamic gallery environment that suggests performance and improvisation.

For TCU, Barontini presents an immersive panorama at Fort Worth Contemporary Arts where visitors will be surrounded by large-scale fabric works, accompanied by an audio piece commissioned by hip hop musician Mike Ladd. Inspired by Barontini’s research on Haitian General Toussaint Louverture (1743-1803) and other leaders of the Haitian Revolution (1791–1804), the exhibition engages with a precise historical moment, the Battle of Vertières, and the fight independence from French colonial rule. Barontini considers equestrian portraiture as a symbol of identity and power, and in the context of Fort Worth, reflects on the history of the American cowboy, or more specifically, cowboys of color. Understood in this way Caribbean Fantasia represents an imaginary vision of a cavalcade for freedom.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on view through May 2.

The Art Galleries at TCU will present "Caribbean Fantasia," featuring new work by artist Raphaël Barontini. The Paris-based artist uses photographic imagery on textiles to create installations that conjure spectacle, celebration and ritual. From large-scale colorful banners and flags to items of customized clothing, his vibrant printed fabric work combines pattern and portraiture that is both eye-catching and alluring. His juxtaposition of seductive surfaces, playful fringe and tassels against silky drapery and soft leather, creates a dynamic gallery environment that suggests performance and improvisation.

For TCU, Barontini presents an immersive panorama at Fort Worth Contemporary Arts where visitors will be surrounded by large-scale fabric works, accompanied by an audio piece commissioned by hip hop musician Mike Ladd. Inspired by Barontini’s research on Haitian General Toussaint Louverture (1743-1803) and other leaders of the Haitian Revolution (1791–1804), the exhibition engages with a precise historical moment, the Battle of Vertières, and the fight independence from French colonial rule. Barontini considers equestrian portraiture as a symbol of identity and power, and in the context of Fort Worth, reflects on the history of the American cowboy, or more specifically, cowboys of color. Understood in this way Caribbean Fantasia represents an imaginary vision of a cavalcade for freedom.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on view through May 2.

WHEN

WHERE

Fort Worth Contemporary Arts Gallery
2900 W. Berry St.
Fort Worth, TX 76109
https://calendar.tcu.edu/event/raphael_barontini#.XjxGIi2ZOis

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.