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Photo courtesy of John Rasimus

Swedish artist John Rasimus uses drawing, woodcut prints and animation to create ambitious large-scale installations. His arrangements often start with a simple, small drawing and feature heroic pop culture types, like boxers or cowboys, and sometimes idealized forms like classic female busts. Scaled up and made in 3D form the resulting installations are generous and open-ended, as loose narratives suggesting multiple possibilities. It’s like looking at tattoo flash, where forms exist separately but your gaze makes connections through style, comparing color and line, until ultimately you imagine a complete story across the page.

For "Hideout," Rasimus presents a life-size wooden “outhouse” created from folded paper prints made to suggest the look of real wooden planks. Cartoonish and absurd, the lone structure presents itself as a delicate shelter and personal space for the most intimate activities. The theatricality of the outhouse is accompanied by a series of posters proclaiming "hideout" in reverse text. Employing a style characterized by bold outlines, bright colors and signifiers of Western culture, Rasimus’ work is a dynamic, comedic mash up of Swedish wit and Texan honky tonk aesthetic.

Swedish artist John Rasimus uses drawing, woodcut prints and animation to create ambitious large-scale installations. His arrangements often start with a simple, small drawing and feature heroic pop culture types, like boxers or cowboys, and sometimes idealized forms like classic female busts. Scaled up and made in 3D form the resulting installations are generous and open-ended, as loose narratives suggesting multiple possibilities. It’s like looking at tattoo flash, where forms exist separately but your gaze makes connections through style, comparing color and line, until ultimately you imagine a complete story across the page.

For "Hideout," Rasimus presents a life-size wooden “outhouse” created from folded paper prints made to suggest the look of real wooden planks. Cartoonish and absurd, the lone structure presents itself as a delicate shelter and personal space for the most intimate activities. The theatricality of the outhouse is accompanied by a series of posters proclaiming "hideout" in reverse text. Employing a style characterized by bold outlines, bright colors and signifiers of Western culture, Rasimus’ work is a dynamic, comedic mash up of Swedish wit and Texan honky tonk aesthetic.

Swedish artist John Rasimus uses drawing, woodcut prints and animation to create ambitious large-scale installations. His arrangements often start with a simple, small drawing and feature heroic pop culture types, like boxers or cowboys, and sometimes idealized forms like classic female busts. Scaled up and made in 3D form the resulting installations are generous and open-ended, as loose narratives suggesting multiple possibilities. It’s like looking at tattoo flash, where forms exist separately but your gaze makes connections through style, comparing color and line, until ultimately you imagine a complete story across the page.

For "Hideout," Rasimus presents a life-size wooden “outhouse” created from folded paper prints made to suggest the look of real wooden planks. Cartoonish and absurd, the lone structure presents itself as a delicate shelter and personal space for the most intimate activities. The theatricality of the outhouse is accompanied by a series of posters proclaiming "hideout" in reverse text. Employing a style characterized by bold outlines, bright colors and signifiers of Western culture, Rasimus’ work is a dynamic, comedic mash up of Swedish wit and Texan honky tonk aesthetic.

WHEN

WHERE

Fort Worth Contemporary Arts Gallery
2900 W. Berry St.
Fort Worth, TX 76109
https://finearts.tcu.edu/art/events-and-programs/the-art-galleries-at-tcu/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.