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Photo courtesy of Richie Budd, Kris Pierce and John Rasimus

The artists describe "Persona" as loosely referencing Ingmar Bergman’s 1966 Swedish film of the same title; an experimental, psychological drama renowned for its perplexing suggestion that the two main characters experience a type of an emotional convergence. Formatted as three concurrent solo exhibitions, the artists’ work circles ideas relating to identity, duality, and character as traits of humans’ inherent need to distinguish and validate their existence as individuals.

Through these individual presentations, the artists consider the development of persona in real and digital space, including involvement of physical senses. In different ways they each speak to a complicated desire to exist at the center of one’s own universe. Working within an anti-collaborative format, a web of connections between the artists’ approaches is revealed without the dynamics of a traditional group exhibition or the type of social alliance that informs much contemporary media.

In his exhibition "Dead Souls," Richie Budd presents new biomorphic sculptures that suggest meaning through shape and sensation. The forms include multi-sensory devices such as Halloween ghost projectors, sound components, fans that distribute the smell of essential oils, popcorn makers popping, and George Foreman Grills that allow the artist to cook hotdogs. Through these sculptures Budd hopes to entice an affective encounter for gallery visitors that cultivates their future memories.

Kris Pierce’s new multimedia works in his exhibition "Oil Can Tremolo" explore virtual identity through a real-time gathering of sources from social media platforms. Concerned with how we project and perceive our own reality, Pierce reflects on the trend of main character syndrome; a TikTok phenomenon where people imagine and act out scenarios playing the "main character" in a fictionalized version of their lives. His works ask us to consider how aspects of self-assurance, confidence are understood in American culture, and how technology has the potential to transform healthy individualism into a type of harmful narcissism.

Swedish artist John Rasimus uses drawing, print and animation to create ambitious large-scale installations that playfully challenge media characteristics and rest on illusion. For "Hideout," his exhibition at Fort Worth Contemporary Arts, Rasimus presents a life-size wooden “outhouse” created from folded paper prints made to suggest the look of real wooden planks. Cartoonish and absurd, the lone structure presents itself as a delicate shelter and personal space for the most intimate activities. Employing a style characterized by bold outlines, bright colors and references to cowboys and other signifiers of Western culture, Rasimus’ work is a dynamic, comedic mash up of Swedish wit and Texan honky tonk aesthetic.

The artists describe "Persona" as loosely referencing Ingmar Bergman’s 1966 Swedish film of the same title; an experimental, psychological drama renowned for its perplexing suggestion that the two main characters experience a type of an emotional convergence. Formatted as three concurrent solo exhibitions, the artists’ work circles ideas relating to identity, duality, and character as traits of humans’ inherent need to distinguish and validate their existence as individuals.

Through these individual presentations, the artists consider the development of persona in real and digital space, including involvement of physical senses. In different ways they each speak to a complicated desire to exist at the center of one’s own universe. Working within an anti-collaborative format, a web of connections between the artists’ approaches is revealed without the dynamics of a traditional group exhibition or the type of social alliance that informs much contemporary media.

In his exhibition "Dead Souls," Richie Budd presents new biomorphic sculptures that suggest meaning through shape and sensation. The forms include multi-sensory devices such as Halloween ghost projectors, sound components, fans that distribute the smell of essential oils, popcorn makers popping, and George Foreman Grills that allow the artist to cook hotdogs. Through these sculptures Budd hopes to entice an affective encounter for gallery visitors that cultivates their future memories.

Kris Pierce’s new multimedia works in his exhibition "Oil Can Tremolo" explore virtual identity through a real-time gathering of sources from social media platforms. Concerned with how we project and perceive our own reality, Pierce reflects on the trend of main character syndrome; a TikTok phenomenon where people imagine and act out scenarios playing the "main character" in a fictionalized version of their lives. His works ask us to consider how aspects of self-assurance, confidence are understood in American culture, and how technology has the potential to transform healthy individualism into a type of harmful narcissism.

Swedish artist John Rasimus uses drawing, print and animation to create ambitious large-scale installations that playfully challenge media characteristics and rest on illusion. For "Hideout," his exhibition at Fort Worth Contemporary Arts, Rasimus presents a life-size wooden “outhouse” created from folded paper prints made to suggest the look of real wooden planks. Cartoonish and absurd, the lone structure presents itself as a delicate shelter and personal space for the most intimate activities. Employing a style characterized by bold outlines, bright colors and references to cowboys and other signifiers of Western culture, Rasimus’ work is a dynamic, comedic mash up of Swedish wit and Texan honky tonk aesthetic.

The artists describe "Persona" as loosely referencing Ingmar Bergman’s 1966 Swedish film of the same title; an experimental, psychological drama renowned for its perplexing suggestion that the two main characters experience a type of an emotional convergence. Formatted as three concurrent solo exhibitions, the artists’ work circles ideas relating to identity, duality, and character as traits of humans’ inherent need to distinguish and validate their existence as individuals.

Through these individual presentations, the artists consider the development of persona in real and digital space, including involvement of physical senses. In different ways they each speak to a complicated desire to exist at the center of one’s own universe. Working within an anti-collaborative format, a web of connections between the artists’ approaches is revealed without the dynamics of a traditional group exhibition or the type of social alliance that informs much contemporary media.

In his exhibition "Dead Souls," Richie Budd presents new biomorphic sculptures that suggest meaning through shape and sensation. The forms include multi-sensory devices such as Halloween ghost projectors, sound components, fans that distribute the smell of essential oils, popcorn makers popping, and George Foreman Grills that allow the artist to cook hotdogs. Through these sculptures Budd hopes to entice an affective encounter for gallery visitors that cultivates their future memories.

Kris Pierce’s new multimedia works in his exhibition "Oil Can Tremolo" explore virtual identity through a real-time gathering of sources from social media platforms. Concerned with how we project and perceive our own reality, Pierce reflects on the trend of main character syndrome; a TikTok phenomenon where people imagine and act out scenarios playing the "main character" in a fictionalized version of their lives. His works ask us to consider how aspects of self-assurance, confidence are understood in American culture, and how technology has the potential to transform healthy individualism into a type of harmful narcissism.

Swedish artist John Rasimus uses drawing, print and animation to create ambitious large-scale installations that playfully challenge media characteristics and rest on illusion. For "Hideout," his exhibition at Fort Worth Contemporary Arts, Rasimus presents a life-size wooden “outhouse” created from folded paper prints made to suggest the look of real wooden planks. Cartoonish and absurd, the lone structure presents itself as a delicate shelter and personal space for the most intimate activities. Employing a style characterized by bold outlines, bright colors and references to cowboys and other signifiers of Western culture, Rasimus’ work is a dynamic, comedic mash up of Swedish wit and Texan honky tonk aesthetic.

WHEN

WHERE

Fort Worth Contemporary Arts Gallery
2900 W. Berry St.
Fort Worth, TX 76109
https://finearts.tcu.edu/art/events-and-programs/the-art-galleries-at-tcu/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
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