Photo courtesy of Kimbell Art Museum

Jessica L. Fripp, assistant professor of art history at Texas Christian University, will present a lecture entitled Painted Ladies in Casanova's Time as part of the Museum's "Art in Context" series, in conjunction with the exhibition "Casanova: The Seduction of Europe."

Casanova claimed that the French portraitist Jean-Marc Nattier could paint a woman who was ugly, yet make her appear beautiful, deeming the artist's skills "magic." While Nattier was certainly a talented artist, his portraits, and the opinions of Casanova, who had his own ideas about beauty, should be considered within constructions of femininity of their time. This talk addresses portraits of women by Nattier and others alongside societal expectations of dress, make-up and behavior of women in 18th-century France.

Jessica L. Fripp, assistant professor of art history at Texas Christian University, will present a lecture entitled Painted Ladies in Casanova's Time as part of the Museum's "Art in Context" series, in conjunction with the exhibition "Casanova: The Seduction of Europe."

Casanova claimed that the French portraitist Jean-Marc Nattier could paint a woman who was ugly, yet make her appear beautiful, deeming the artist's skills "magic." While Nattier was certainly a talented artist, his portraits, and the opinions of Casanova, who had his own ideas about beauty, should be considered within constructions of femininity of their time. This talk addresses portraits of women by Nattier and others alongside societal expectations of dress, make-up and behavior of women in 18th-century France.

Jessica L. Fripp, assistant professor of art history at Texas Christian University, will present a lecture entitled Painted Ladies in Casanova's Time as part of the Museum's "Art in Context" series, in conjunction with the exhibition "Casanova: The Seduction of Europe."

Casanova claimed that the French portraitist Jean-Marc Nattier could paint a woman who was ugly, yet make her appear beautiful, deeming the artist's skills "magic." While Nattier was certainly a talented artist, his portraits, and the opinions of Casanova, who had his own ideas about beauty, should be considered within constructions of femininity of their time. This talk addresses portraits of women by Nattier and others alongside societal expectations of dress, make-up and behavior of women in 18th-century France.

WHEN

WHERE

Kimbell Art Museum
3333 Camp Bowie Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX 76107
http://www.kimbellart.org/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.