Image courtesy of Kimbell Art Museum

Three works by Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani will join the Kimbell’s limestone sculpture, Head (c. 1913), as “guests of honor.” Drawn from the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation and usually on loan to the Princeton University Art Museum, the three works include another limestone Head (c. 1910–11) and two paintings - portraits of the poet, designer and filmmaker Jean Cocteau (1916) and the Russian sculptor Léon Indenbaum (1916).

Carved directly in stone, Modigliani’s sculpture was informed by works he admired in Paris, including African, Egyptian, ancient Greek and Cambodian statuary. Together, the Pearlman Foundation and Kimbell Head sculptures represent two of approximately 27 known works that Modigliani made before he abandoned the medium. The two portraits of fellow members of the avant-garde express the artist’s signature language of elegant, often elongated geometric forms.

Three works by Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani will join the Kimbell’s limestone sculpture, Head (c. 1913), as “guests of honor.” Drawn from the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation and usually on loan to the Princeton University Art Museum, the three works include another limestone Head (c. 1910–11) and two paintings - portraits of the poet, designer and filmmaker Jean Cocteau (1916) and the Russian sculptor Léon Indenbaum (1916).

Carved directly in stone, Modigliani’s sculpture was informed by works he admired in Paris, including African, Egyptian, ancient Greek and Cambodian statuary. Together, the Pearlman Foundation and Kimbell Head sculptures represent two of approximately 27 known works that Modigliani made before he abandoned the medium. The two portraits of fellow members of the avant-garde express the artist’s signature language of elegant, often elongated geometric forms.

Three works by Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani will join the Kimbell’s limestone sculpture, Head (c. 1913), as “guests of honor.” Drawn from the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation and usually on loan to the Princeton University Art Museum, the three works include another limestone Head (c. 1910–11) and two paintings - portraits of the poet, designer and filmmaker Jean Cocteau (1916) and the Russian sculptor Léon Indenbaum (1916).

Carved directly in stone, Modigliani’s sculpture was informed by works he admired in Paris, including African, Egyptian, ancient Greek and Cambodian statuary. Together, the Pearlman Foundation and Kimbell Head sculptures represent two of approximately 27 known works that Modigliani made before he abandoned the medium. The two portraits of fellow members of the avant-garde express the artist’s signature language of elegant, often elongated geometric forms.

WHEN

WHERE

Kimbell Art Museum
3333 Camp Bowie Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX 76107
https://kimbellart.org/

TICKET INFO

All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.