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Photo courtesy of Kimbell Art Museum

Richard R. Brettell, founding director, The Edith O'Donnell Institute of Art History; Margaret McDermott Distinguished Chair, The University of Texas at Dallas, will present a free lecture entitled Monet at the First Impressionist Exhibition.

Impression Sunrise, painted by Claude Monet in 1872, was famously the source of the name "Impressionism," used by a satirical critic to denigrate the artists as "mere impressionists." Less well known is its inclusion in the Exhibition of Independent Artists in Nadar's photographic studio in the spring of 1874. Brettell's lecture will reconstruct Monet's submissions to the exhibition in the context of his fellow exhibitors, including Boudin, Renoir, Pissarro, Degas, Sisley and artists long forgotten. The lecture will examine the extensive criticism of the Independents as well as Édouard Manet's decision not to join his friends and the works he showed instead at the Salon of 1874.

Brettell is among the foremost authorities on Impressionism and French painting of the period 1830­-1930, writing countless scholarly publications on these subjects. Recent books include Pissarro's People (2010), From the Private Collections of Texas: European Art, Ancient to Modern (2009), GauguinandImpressionism (2005) and Impression: Painting Quickly in France, 1860-1900 (2001).

Richard R. Brettell, founding director, The Edith O'Donnell Institute of Art History; Margaret McDermott Distinguished Chair, The University of Texas at Dallas, will present a free lecture entitled Monet at the First Impressionist Exhibition.

Impression Sunrise, painted by Claude Monet in 1872, was famously the source of the name "Impressionism," used by a satirical critic to denigrate the artists as "mere impressionists." Less well known is its inclusion in the Exhibition of Independent Artists in Nadar's photographic studio in the spring of 1874. Brettell's lecture will reconstruct Monet's submissions to the exhibition in the context of his fellow exhibitors, including Boudin, Renoir, Pissarro, Degas, Sisley and artists long forgotten. The lecture will examine the extensive criticism of the Independents as well as Édouard Manet's decision not to join his friends and the works he showed instead at the Salon of 1874.

Brettell is among the foremost authorities on Impressionism and French painting of the period 1830­-1930, writing countless scholarly publications on these subjects. Recent books include Pissarro's People (2010), From the Private Collections of Texas: European Art, Ancient to Modern (2009), GauguinandImpressionism (2005) and Impression: Painting Quickly in France, 1860-1900 (2001).

Richard R. Brettell, founding director, The Edith O'Donnell Institute of Art History; Margaret McDermott Distinguished Chair, The University of Texas at Dallas, will present a free lecture entitled Monet at the First Impressionist Exhibition.

Impression Sunrise, painted by Claude Monet in 1872, was famously the source of the name "Impressionism," used by a satirical critic to denigrate the artists as "mere impressionists." Less well known is its inclusion in the Exhibition of Independent Artists in Nadar's photographic studio in the spring of 1874. Brettell's lecture will reconstruct Monet's submissions to the exhibition in the context of his fellow exhibitors, including Boudin, Renoir, Pissarro, Degas, Sisley and artists long forgotten. The lecture will examine the extensive criticism of the Independents as well as Édouard Manet's decision not to join his friends and the works he showed instead at the Salon of 1874.

Brettell is among the foremost authorities on Impressionism and French painting of the period 1830­-1930, writing countless scholarly publications on these subjects. Recent books include Pissarro's People (2010), From the Private Collections of Texas: European Art, Ancient to Modern (2009), GauguinandImpressionism (2005) and Impression: Painting Quickly in France, 1860-1900 (2001).

WHEN

WHERE

Kimbell Art Museum
3333 Camp Bowie Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX 76107
http://www.kimbellmuseum.org/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.