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Photo courtesy of Kimbell Art Museum

Lee Talbot, curator of Eastern Hemisphere Collections at The George Washington University and The Textile Museum in Washington, DC, will present a free lecture entitled, Shimmering Splendor, Woven Wealth: Silk in Imperial China and Beyond.

Around 5,000 years ago, people living in what is now China discovered that cocoons of the Bombyx mori moth could be unraveled and woven into silk, a lustrous, lightweight, durable and comfortable fabric. Sericulture remained a closely guarded secret for millennia and went on to become one of China's greatest contributions to world culture. Illustrating textiles from the Sam and Myrna Myers Collection, recent archaeological discoveries, and museum repositories worldwide as examples, this lecture will provide a colorful overview of silk's historical and cultural development while highlighting the fascinating physical properties that render silk the world's most prized and fabled fabric.

Lee Talbot, curator of Eastern Hemisphere Collections at The George Washington University and The Textile Museum in Washington, DC, will present a free lecture entitled, Shimmering Splendor, Woven Wealth: Silk in Imperial China and Beyond.

Around 5,000 years ago, people living in what is now China discovered that cocoons of the Bombyx mori moth could be unraveled and woven into silk, a lustrous, lightweight, durable and comfortable fabric. Sericulture remained a closely guarded secret for millennia and went on to become one of China's greatest contributions to world culture. Illustrating textiles from the Sam and Myrna Myers Collection, recent archaeological discoveries, and museum repositories worldwide as examples, this lecture will provide a colorful overview of silk's historical and cultural development while highlighting the fascinating physical properties that render silk the world's most prized and fabled fabric.

Lee Talbot, curator of Eastern Hemisphere Collections at The George Washington University and The Textile Museum in Washington, DC, will present a free lecture entitled, Shimmering Splendor, Woven Wealth: Silk in Imperial China and Beyond.

Around 5,000 years ago, people living in what is now China discovered that cocoons of the Bombyx mori moth could be unraveled and woven into silk, a lustrous, lightweight, durable and comfortable fabric. Sericulture remained a closely guarded secret for millennia and went on to become one of China's greatest contributions to world culture. Illustrating textiles from the Sam and Myrna Myers Collection, recent archaeological discoveries, and museum repositories worldwide as examples, this lecture will provide a colorful overview of silk's historical and cultural development while highlighting the fascinating physical properties that render silk the world's most prized and fabled fabric.

WHEN

WHERE

Kimbell Art Museum
3333 Camp Bowie Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX 76107
http://www.kimbellmuseum.org/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
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