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Photo by Thierry Ollivier

Katherine Anne Paul, curator of the arts of Asia at the Newark Museum, New Jersey, will present a free lecture entitled Transcendent Specifics: Buddhist Arts of Tibet, Japan, Korea and China.       

Like art of other global religions, each region where Buddhism took hold developed locally specific iterations. While the central story about the life of the historical Buddha Shakyamuni is shared by all practitioners, in the artistic practices of Tibet, Japan, Korea and China, images of figures other than the historical Buddha rose in popularity. Each area made images from locally available materials and developed stylistic characteristics that are distinct to both place and time.

This illustrated lecture will not only unlock the basics of how to read narratives and iconography of Buddhist art, but also will highlight distinguishing factors of each regional manifestation.

Katherine Anne Paul, curator of the arts of Asia at the Newark Museum, New Jersey, will present a free lecture entitled Transcendent Specifics: Buddhist Arts of Tibet, Japan, Korea and China.

Like art of other global religions, each region where Buddhism took hold developed locally specific iterations. While the central story about the life of the historical Buddha Shakyamuni is shared by all practitioners, in the artistic practices of Tibet, Japan, Korea and China, images of figures other than the historical Buddha rose in popularity. Each area made images from locally available materials and developed stylistic characteristics that are distinct to both place and time.

This illustrated lecture will not only unlock the basics of how to read narratives and iconography of Buddhist art, but also will highlight distinguishing factors of each regional manifestation.

Katherine Anne Paul, curator of the arts of Asia at the Newark Museum, New Jersey, will present a free lecture entitled Transcendent Specifics: Buddhist Arts of Tibet, Japan, Korea and China.

Like art of other global religions, each region where Buddhism took hold developed locally specific iterations. While the central story about the life of the historical Buddha Shakyamuni is shared by all practitioners, in the artistic practices of Tibet, Japan, Korea and China, images of figures other than the historical Buddha rose in popularity. Each area made images from locally available materials and developed stylistic characteristics that are distinct to both place and time.

This illustrated lecture will not only unlock the basics of how to read narratives and iconography of Buddhist art, but also will highlight distinguishing factors of each regional manifestation.

WHEN

WHERE

Kimbell Art Museum
3333 Camp Bowie Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX 76107
http://www.kimbellart.org/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
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