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Photo courtesy of Kimbell Art Museum

Larry Silver, Farquhar Professor of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, will present a free lecture entitled Rembrandt, the Jews, and "That Portrait" in the Piano Pavilion Auditorium.

Seventeenth-century Amsterdam was a "religious soup" of varying Protestant denominations, millenarian hopes and even Jewish immigrants, chiefly from Portugal but also from Central Europe. Rembrandt, whose neighborhood included prosperous Jews, responded sensitively to the Hebrew Bible and to the presence of such living descendants of the Bible. But he was also a committed Christian whose representation of the Jewish people differed markedly in scenes from the Old and New Testaments.

This talk will examine the important Rembrandt portrait in the Kimbell, identified as a young Jew, in this context, including in relation to the artist's own portrait-like images of the head of Jesus.

Larry Silver, Farquhar Professor of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, will present a free lecture entitled Rembrandt, the Jews, and "That Portrait" in the Piano Pavilion Auditorium.

Seventeenth-century Amsterdam was a "religious soup" of varying Protestant denominations, millenarian hopes and even Jewish immigrants, chiefly from Portugal but also from Central Europe. Rembrandt, whose neighborhood included prosperous Jews, responded sensitively to the Hebrew Bible and to the presence of such living descendants of the Bible. But he was also a committed Christian whose representation of the Jewish people differed markedly in scenes from the Old and New Testaments.

This talk will examine the important Rembrandt portrait in the Kimbell, identified as a young Jew, in this context, including in relation to the artist's own portrait-like images of the head of Jesus.

Larry Silver, Farquhar Professor of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, will present a free lecture entitled Rembrandt, the Jews, and "That Portrait" in the Piano Pavilion Auditorium.

Seventeenth-century Amsterdam was a "religious soup" of varying Protestant denominations, millenarian hopes and even Jewish immigrants, chiefly from Portugal but also from Central Europe. Rembrandt, whose neighborhood included prosperous Jews, responded sensitively to the Hebrew Bible and to the presence of such living descendants of the Bible. But he was also a committed Christian whose representation of the Jewish people differed markedly in scenes from the Old and New Testaments.

This talk will examine the important Rembrandt portrait in the Kimbell, identified as a young Jew, in this context, including in relation to the artist's own portrait-like images of the head of Jesus.

WHEN

WHERE

Kimbell Art Museum
3333 Camp Bowie Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX 76107
http://www.kimbellart.org/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
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