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Photo courtesy of Kehinde Wiley, the North Carolina Museum of Art, and Sean Kelly, New York

Two paintings depicting different versions of the Old Testament story of Judith and Holofernes, one by Italian Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi and the other by American contemporary artist Kehinde Wiley, will be on view at the Kimbell for a limited time. Strikingly different renditions of the same subject realized exactly 400 years apart, the paintings will allow visitors to reflect on contemporary issues through a historical lens.

Gentileschi’s Judith Slaying Holofernes is both a powerful statement of her skill as an artist - which gained her much recognition during her lifetime, and a statement of the adversity overcome by a young woman who succeeded at establishing a painting practice at a time when the field was almost entirely male dominated.

Wiley is best known for his monumental portraits of young Black men placed in historical poses and settings appropriated from Old Master paintings. He consistently addresses issues of race within art history while also commenting on contemporary culture, identity, power and inequality.

Two paintings depicting different versions of the Old Testament story of Judith and Holofernes, one by Italian Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi and the other by American contemporary artist Kehinde Wiley, will be on view at the Kimbell for a limited time. Strikingly different renditions of the same subject realized exactly 400 years apart, the paintings will allow visitors to reflect on contemporary issues through a historical lens.

Gentileschi’s Judith Slaying Holofernes is both a powerful statement of her skill as an artist - which gained her much recognition during her lifetime, and a statement of the adversity overcome by a young woman who succeeded at establishing a painting practice at a time when the field was almost entirely male dominated.

Wiley is best known for his monumental portraits of young Black men placed in historical poses and settings appropriated from Old Master paintings. He consistently addresses issues of race within art history while also commenting on contemporary culture, identity, power and inequality.

Two paintings depicting different versions of the Old Testament story of Judith and Holofernes, one by Italian Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi and the other by American contemporary artist Kehinde Wiley, will be on view at the Kimbell for a limited time. Strikingly different renditions of the same subject realized exactly 400 years apart, the paintings will allow visitors to reflect on contemporary issues through a historical lens.

Gentileschi’s Judith Slaying Holofernes is both a powerful statement of her skill as an artist - which gained her much recognition during her lifetime, and a statement of the adversity overcome by a young woman who succeeded at establishing a painting practice at a time when the field was almost entirely male dominated.

Wiley is best known for his monumental portraits of young Black men placed in historical poses and settings appropriated from Old Master paintings. He consistently addresses issues of race within art history while also commenting on contemporary culture, identity, power and inequality.

WHEN

WHERE

Kimbell Art Museum
3333 Camp Bowie Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX 76107
https://kimbellart.org/Gentileschi-Wiley

TICKET INFO

Free-$18
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